Articles of War


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Articles of War

 

(1) The first military criminal code in Russia (published Apr. 25, 1715), which became the second part of the Regulations of War of 1716. The need for an elaboration of military articles was bound up with the formation of a regular standing army in Russia. The articles contained an enumeration of military crimes and established means of punishment for these crimes. For such crimes as, for example, treason, refusal of military service, and disobeying an order, cruel punishments were prescribed, such as being beaten with a whip or with rods or suffering exile at hard labor or the death penalty. The Articles of War included the text of the military oath, which emphasized consciousness of the importance of fulfilling one’s military duty, of maintaining one’s loyalty to the banner, and of the observance of firm military discipline. In 1715 a collection of military procedural law titled Short Statement of Procedure or Litigations (third part of the Regulations of War of 1716) was also published.

(2) The Russian term artikul in the 18th and 19th centuries referred to a paragraph in a set of rules or resolutions and also the manual of a rifle.

References in periodicals archive ?
American Articles of War of 1776, in Military Law and Precedents, 2nd ed.
The Quirin Court stated that the Articles of War, 10 U.
By enacting the Articles of War, Congress defined not only the procedures but also the punishments for the field of military law.
33) Yet, recognizing the need for a means to discipline the troops swiftly and without the required formalities of civilian justice, the Continental Congress adopted the American Articles of War, which authorized a national armed force.
Article of War 15 came into existence as part of the 1916 revisions to the Articles of War.
The court [is] of opinion that Captain von Heer exacted, without authority, money for licensing sutlers, being a breach of Article 5th, Section 18th, of the Rules and Articles of War.
The prosecution failed to produce enough evidence to support their claim that the officers had violated Article 67 (mutiny or sedition) of the Articles of War.
38) As the Articles of War were being modernized, the Judge Advocate General of the U.
Article 88 of the UCMJ is rooted in the British Articles of War of 1765.
By the Articles of War, and especially Article 15, Congress has explicitly provided, so far as it may constitutionally do so, that military tribunals shall have jurisdiction to try offenders or offenses against the law of war in appropriate cases.
The soldiers are facing charges of violating the Articles of War, including mutiny, conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline, disrespect to the president, vice president and the secretary of national defense, and insubordination, according to the charge sheet.