Arveragus

Arveragus

delivers wife to adulterer to keep promise. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “The Franklin’s Tale”]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
67] Aurelius, seeking the connivance of a magician to secure the love of Dorigen, who is distraught at the absence of her husband Arveragus, finds the treacherous clerk of Orleans with an eerie foreknowledge of the dilemma.
1121 There is a "vibrant sense of elemental contrarieties in operation" in the love between Dorigen and her spouse Arveragus as much as that between Boethius and his spiritual wife.
2003 "Thou and tears: The advice of Arveragus to Dorigen in Chaucer's Franklin's Tale", Review of English Studies 54: 308-312.
152), we shall be apt also to dismiss Arveragus, the worthy knight of his tale, as a show-off too, and, indeed, Condren unsurprisingly concludes that `to Arveragus, as to his Franklin creator, all is for show' (p.
In the Franklin's Tale Dorigen is at least the social equal of Arveragus.
The relationship of Dorigen and Arveragus is a relationship based on love, not on lordship and wealth.
In so far as she has made a promise she has expressed her will, and therefore Arveragus accepts it.
Dorigen no less than Arveragus attaches importance not only to virtue but also to the reputation for virtue.
The crisis that overtakes the marriage of Dorigen and Arveragus comes about through no special failing on the part of the married lovers themselves, but from the unwelcome intervention of a third party.
And in his herte hadde greet compassioun Of hire and of hire lamentacioun, And of Arveragus, the worthy knyght, That bad hire holden al that she had hight, So looth hym was his wyf sholde breke hir trouthe.
Arveragus knows that if he asks his wife to obey him, she will obey him.