Aryabhata


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Aryabhata

(är'yəbhŭt`ə), c.476–550, Hindu mathematician and astronomer. He is one of the first known to have used algebra; his writings include rules of arithmetic and of plane and spherical trigonometry, and solutions of quadratic equations.
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It is also believed Aryabhata was the principal head at Nalanda University later in his life.
Aryabhata was the first indigenously built Indian satellite, which was launched on April 19, 1975.
The Hindu mathematician and astronomer Aryabhata (476-550) collected and expanded upon earlier Hindu advances in trigonometry.
The sine function in its modern form was first defined in the Surya Siddhanta and its properties were further documented by the fifth century Indian mathematician and astronomer Aryabhata.
The support extended by the management of Aryabhata Institute of Technology and Science is highly appreciated.
For centuries, philosophers, astronomers and mathematicians had attempted to reconcile analogical time (the time of nature) with different versions of cosmological time (religious renditions of the time of the sacred): the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century, the Hindu astronomer Aryabhata in the 6th century, the Venerable Bede in the 8th century, the Arab mathematician Mohammed Ibn Musa al-Khwarizmi in the 9th century and the Oxford Franciscan Roger Bacon in the 13th century.
Siddhanta, Aryabhata I, Brahmagupta, Lalla, and modern Surya Siddhanta.
630) was the first to demonstrate the use of negative numbers, while Aryabhata (A.
By the Middle Ages, Aryabhata, an Indian mathematician, had calculated the value for pi.
This is the Indian Space Research Organisation's ( ISRO) 100th mission, which began with an experimental satellite called Aryabhata launched by a Russian rocket in April 1975.
India entered the age of satellite technology with the launch of its first indigenous satellite, Aryabhata , on April 19, 1975 onboard a Russian rocket C1- Intercosmos.
The scientists named these new species as Janibacter hoylei, after the distinguished Astrophysicist Fred Hoyle, the second as Bacillus isronensis recognising the contribution of ISRO in the balloon experiments which led to its discovery and the third as Bacillus aryabhata after India's celebrated ancient astronomer Aryabhata.