arytenoid

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Related to Arytenoids: corniculate, larynx

arytenoid

[‚ar·ə′tē‚nȯid]
(anatomy)
Relating to either of the paired, pyramid-shaped, pivoting cartilages on the dorsal aspect of the larynx, in humans and most other mammals, to which the vocal cords and arytenoid muscles are attached.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prescott advised surgeons to focus on three supraglouic elements during the physical examination: the epiglottis, the aryepiglottic folds, and the mucosa over the corniculate cartilages on the arytenoids.
Physical exploration and endoscopy detected a 4-cm tumor in the neoglottic area at the site of the left arytenoids.
12) The laryngeal tissues of infants are relatively soft and flaccid and their aryepiglottic folds and arytenoid tissues are relatively large; as a result, their glottic opening is smaller and their larynx is flabbier and softer.
At the 2-week follow-up, the patient reported improved symptoms; however, repeat stroboscopy exhibited persistent, severe redundancy of the posterior arytenoid tissue.
Asymmetric thickening of the vocal cord on the left side, dilated left pyriform sinus and left laryngeal ventricle, and anteriomedial deviation of the arytenoid cartilage were illustrated.
The AP Advance DAB requires that the bottom bar of the tube guide is lined up with the arytenoids in order to facilitate intubation.
Hence, in the prevention of anterior subluxation, it would seem logical that good visualisation of the laryngeal inlet including the position of the arytenoids is important prior to instrumentation of the airway.
Fiberoptic examination of the larynx revealed that the mucosa of the epiglottis, arytenoids, and vocal folds was very pale.
There was resistance at the level of the vocal cords or the arytenoids.
The most commonly involved structures in the supraglottic region are, in order of descending frequency, the epiglottis, arytenoids, aryepiglottic folds, and ventricular folds--areas rich in lymphatic vessels.
It usually results from anatomical and technical problems, which include obstruction by laryngeal and pharyngeal structures such as down-folding of the epiglottis, obstruction by the arytenoids and saliva, as well as secretions obscuring the surface of the lens.
When the patient was evaluated the next day, endoscopy showed an ulceroproliferative growth involving the bilateral arytenoids, false vocal folds, and the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis.