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Asgard

(ăs`gärd), in Norse mythology, home of the gods, also known as Aesir. It consisted of luxurious palaces and halls, in which the gods (whose chief was Odin) dwelled, conferred, and banqueted. One of the most beautiful of these halls was ValhallaValhalla
or Walhalla
, in Norse mythology, Odin's hall for slain heroes. This martial paradise was one of the most beautiful halls of Asgard. The dead warriors, brought to Valhalla by the Valkyries, fought during the day and feasted at night.
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. Entrance to Asgard could be gained only by crossing the rainbow bridge Bifrost, which was guarded by Heimdall, the watchman of the gods. See also Germanic religionGermanic religion,
pre-Christian religious practices among the tribes of Western Europe, Germany, and Scandinavia. The main sources for our knowledge are the Germania of Tacitus and the Elder Edda and the Younger Edda.
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Asgard

abode of the gods. [Norse Myth.: Walsh Classical, 34]
See: Heaven
References in periodicals archive ?
Bromley and Asgaard 1979), or even a "simultaneous community" approach (Ekdale et al.
The established organisms, unsuited to such environmental changes, either had to relocate by displacing themselves upward, or perish (Bromley and Asgaard 1991).
Such cycles of erosion and deposition not only provide a taphonomic filter, but also a repetition of the same trace-fossil association overprinting itself (Bromley and Asgaard 1991).
Because of these differences, we prefer the interpretations of Bromley and Asgaard (1979), Schlirf and Uchman (2005), and Schlirf et al.
Terrestrial arthropods that could have made this type of burrow include insects, particularly coleopterans, and their larvae (Bromley and Asgaard 1979; Hasiotis 2002; Schlirf and Uchman 2005).
The Asgaard PrivateLine System provides totally secure sites and network connection between both sites and mobile personnel using laptops.
Rather than a catalogue, articles from the Louisiana Magasin and a special edition of the Louisiana Revy accompany the exhibition: there is in the latter a gnomic piece of outstanding density by Kenneth Frampton, but also useful contributions by others, including Merete Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Richard Weston, Michael Asgaard Andersen, and Francoise Fromonot.