Assimilators


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Assimilators

 

in botany. (1) The assimilating apparatus of many liverworts in the form of short rows of chlorophyl-lose cells.

(2) Lamellar outgrowths of palisade tissue running along the leaf of certain mosses (for example, haircap moss).

(3) Cells located on the axial filament of the thallus of certain red algae (for example, Batrachospermum), which play a basic role in the process of biological assimilation.

References in periodicals archive ?
When the facts contradict a plan or a theory they will go with the facts, exactly the opposite of the assimilator, who would be more likely to disregard or re-examine the facts.
These learners, similar to assimilators, prefer to hesitate about concepts rather than communicating with others.
Bhawuk, "The Role of Culture Theory in Cross-Cultural Training: A Multimethod Study of Culture-Specific, Culture-General and Theory-Based Assimilators," Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 29, 630-655, 1998.
For example, the first odds ratio in the Table is calculated as the ratio of African American Assimilators (n = 29) to African American non-Assimilators (n = 30) multiplied by the ratio of non-African American non-Assimilators (n = 210) to the number of Assimilators who are not African American (n = 80).
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE ASSIMILATORS AND EXPULSIONISTS: ENDING WITH "EVERYTHING MOORISH" OR ELIMINATING "THE MORISCOS"
You, the "Righteous [Hasidim]" are the "Am Kaddishei Elyonim [Nation of the holy elevated ones]" and will awaken to glory, and the non-righteous assimilators will awaken to ignominy.
Bhawuk, "The Role of Culture Theory in Cross-Cultural Training: A Multimethod Study of Culture-Specific, Culture-General, and Culture Theory-Based Assimilators," Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 29 (September 1998), 630-55.
Historian of education Jonathan Zimmerman has fittingly dubbed them "ethnic assimilators.
Frameworks emphasising the importance of cultural and environmental orientation, cultural assimilators, sensitivity training, field experiences and language training have been developed (Littrell & Salas 2005).
Rather than being passive assimilators of European modernity, the Shona have taken an active role in the selection and at times fusion of what they got from Europe and what they already had as a people.
In recent times this fear has been countered by a discourse positioning Japan as great assimilators, able to absorb Western culture without losing their Japanese spirit (see Sakamoto 120).