Assiniboine

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Assiniboine

(əsĭn`əboin), river, 590 mi (950 km) long, rising in S Sask., Canada, and flowing SE into Man. then E to the Red RiverRed River.
1 River, 1,222 mi (1,967 km) long, southernmost of the large tributaries of the Mississippi River. It rises in two branches in the Texas Panhandle and flows SE between Texas and Oklahoma and between Texas and Arkansas to Fulton, Ark.
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 at Winnipeg; named for the local Native Americans, the Assiniboine. The Qu'Appelle and Souris rivers are its chief tributaries. The Assiniboine valley is one of Canada's leading wheat-growing areas. The river was explored by the VérendryeVérendrye, Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de la
, 1685–1749, explorer in W Canada and the United States, b. Trois Rivières (Three Rivers), Que. His father was the sieur de Varennes, for a time governor of Trois Rivières.
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 family in 1736, and forts were built at its mouth and near the site of Portage la Prairie. Settlement spread westward along the river from the Red River valley to the plains. In 1970 the Portage Diversion was built on the river above Portage la Prairie to redirect floodwaters to Lake Manitoba.

Assiniboine

a river in W Canada, rising in E Saskatchewan and flowing southeast and east to the Red River at Winnipeg. Length: over 860 km (500 miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
It appears that in September last a party of trappers, which encamped on Bow river, a south branch of the Saskatchewan, about one hundred and fifty miles north of Healy & Hamilton's Indian trading post, which is situated on Belly river, familiarly known as Whoop-Up, just over the Montana line and in the British possessions, was attacked in the night by a band of Assiniboine Indians, who fired into the camp of sleeping trappers, wounding some of them, among whom was a man by the name of McMullen, who is well known in Helena, and who is an old frontiersman.
The Yankton, Yankonai, and Assiniboine Indians descend from a single "council fire" of "Nakota" Indians, who claimed land within traditional Sioux territory at the time of the white settlers' first arrival.
Pink also pointed out that some Assiniboine Indians did not know how to handle a canoe, consequently they could not make the annual trading journey.