Asvins


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Asvins

twin gods of light. [Hindu Myth.: Bent, 60]
See: Light
References in periodicals archive ?
Firstly, we know that the Asvins, one of whose epithets is sindhumdtard 'having sindhuas their mother' (RV 1.
Secondly, the Asvins are known for their ability to save others, especially from drowning: in fact, their "middle name" Nasatya (Avestan Na[eta]hai[theta]) is derived from the root *nes 'to save'.
Thirdly, Surya is one of the three female deities to whom the Asvins are linked in the Vedic myth (along with Ups and Saranyu).
All of the above is also true of the Greek Dioscuri, whose unmistakable affinity with the Vedic Asvins has long been noted and has become firmly entrenched in handbooks of comparative mythology.
Let Bhaga, the Asvins, Sarasvati not carry away that (sura) which is mine.
The alliance of the Pandavas and the Yadava chief Krsna Vasudeva during the Mahabharata wars led to the birth of a new Vaisnava religion, at the center of which was at first a trio that succeeded another with Vedic and older Indo-European roots (the Asvins and their sister): two heroic brothers (the 'strong' white elder brother Arjuna / Baladeva and the black younger brother Krsna Vasudeva) and their sister, whom the elder brother marries.
the "honey doctrine") was disclosed to the Asvins by Dadhyanc Atharvana through the head of a horse, and in support of this statement RV 1.
13, in the explanation of a formula containing the word madhu 'honey', reference is made to Dadhyanc Atharvana giving to the Asvins a doctrinal explanation called "honey" (madhu nama brahmanam).
Although a sacrifice (yajna) is frequently a bigger event than a single offering, the offering to the Asvins (and the most typical offering to the Asvins is the simple Gharma offering) is also called yajna e.
1; and the legend of Dadhyaric and the Asvins (see [sections]9.
This volume begins with a brief discussion of the names of the Asvins (pp.
The gods divide his body into the three pressings of the soma ritual, but they gain no success from the ritual until Makha's head, the head of the sacrifice, is restored by the Asvins.