Atelinae


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Atelinae

 

a subfamily of platyrrine monkeys of the family Cebidae. The monkeys weigh between 4 and 10 kg. The body measures from 34 to 65 cm long, and the tail length is from 55 to 90 cm. The tip of the hairless underside of the tail is covered with cutaneous ridges. The arms are usually longer than the legs; in some individuals the arms and legs are almost equal in length. The thumbs are poorly developed or absent; only monkeys of the genus Lagothrix have thumbs. The big toe is developed. The fur is long and varies in coloration.

The subfamily Atelinae comprises three genera: Ateles (spider monkeys), with four species; Brachyteles (woolly spider monkeys), with one species; and Lagothrix, with two species. The monkeys are distributed in the forests of Central and South America. They live in trees and travel by semibrachiation, hanging by their arms and tails. The animals associate in small family groups or in troops of as many as 100 individuals. They feed on fruits, nuts, insects, and the eggs of birds.

References in periodicals archive ?
Infraorden PLATYRRHINI Geoffroy, 1812 Superfamilia ATELOIDEA Gray, 1825 Familia ATELIDAE Gray, 1825 Subfamilia ATELINAE Gray, 1825 Tribu ALOUATTINI Trouessart, 1897 Genero ALOUATTA Lacepede, 1799
El registro de la localidad de Nacaome, es el mas antiguo que se tiene hasta el momento de un Atelinae para America Central y constituye un importante elemento de la fauna Neotropical de abolengo suramericano en el Pleistoceno Superior de Costa Rica.
The group's prize find: two nearly complete skeletons from the primate family Atelinae, cousins of today's spider monkeys.
The second skeleton from Toca da Boa Vista represents an extinct member of Atelinae that Hartwig says is wholly new to scientists.
In contrast, Alouattinae and Atelinae differ significantly with respect to their feeding habits, the length of their hindguts, the retention times of the ingested food, and their attitudes (Milton 1993).
Some incongruence between morphological and molecular data has emerged in some groups, such as the subfamily Atelinae (Lagothrix E.
The phylogenetic relationships among the Atelinae genera have not been explored until recently (Horovitz et al.