Athanasian Creed


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Related to Athanasian Creed: Athanasius, Apostles Creed, Nicene Creed

Athanasian Creed

(ăthənā`zhən), exact, elaborate Roman Catholic statement on the Trinity and the Incarnation. It is no longer believed to have been written by AthanasiusAthanasius, Saint
, c.297–373, patriarch of Alexandria (328–73), Doctor of the Church, great champion of orthodoxy during the Arian crisis of the 4th cent. (see Arianism).
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, but rather by an unknown Western author of the 6th cent. An English translation appears in the English Book of Common Prayer. It is sometimes called Quicumque or Quicumque Vult [whoever wishes (to be saved)].
References in periodicals archive ?
I conclude, with this additional Reflection, that As it was the Horrible Athanasian Creed that directly brought me to the Baptists, so should I think it one good Step towards the Church of England's admission of Primitive Christianity, if her Archbishops and bishops would but leave off the use of that Creed in their own Chapples; and thereby recommend its Omission to all their Subordinate Clergy.
The entry on Whiston in The Dictionary of National Biography states, "Gradually he became uncomfortable about the Athanasian creed, and finally gave up communion with the church and joined the baptists after Trinity Sunday 1747.
The year before, Maurice had written to a young clergyman and told him that he did not wish to remove the Athanasian Creed from the liturgical service, for two reasons: first, he felt that it expressed some truths better than they were expressed anywhere else, and, secondly, because its inclusion in the service offered him the opportunity to explain to his congregation why he did not consider "the true and simple meaning of the words that meaning which is given thera by the popular opinion of [the] day" (2:483).
He also expressed his pleasant surprise when Kingsley defended the Athanasian Creed in 1870 against Archbishop Tait.