Athanasius of Alexandria


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Athanasius of Alexandria

 

Born circa 295; died May 2, 373. Church leader and theologian; bishop of Alexandria from 328.

Athanasius was an active opponent of Arianism; during the struggle against Arianism he developed the mystical doctrine of “consubstantiality” of god the father and god the son, which was made dogma at the first (325) and second (381) ecumenical councils. (However, Athanasius is not the author of the Creed, which was ascribed to him.) He glorified asceticism as an ideal of religious life. He was the author of the Life of St. Antony. Depending on the support of the monks, he defended the independence of the Church of Alexandria, for which the emperors deposed and exiled him five times in the period 335–65.

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He discusses the Arian controversy and the "authentic" letters of Ignatius; God language in the Ignatian long recension: a christological profile; the Ignatian long recension in fourth-century christological context; Eusebius of Caesarea, Athanasius of Alexandria, and Ignatius of Antioch; and John Chrysostom: in defense of Ignatius.
Abstract: Athanasius of Alexandria wrote his work De synodis in 359, during a period of great theological confusion.
I did my research and found a quote by Athanasius of Alexandria, which says: "Anyone who wants to see the light clearly, needs to wipe his eyes first.
Athanasius of Alexandria, an earlier work that contributed to the conversion of St.
First, he calls attention to the trinitarian theology of Athanasius of Alexandria, who defended the divinity of Jesus at the time of the Arian heresy even at risk to his own life and liberty.
A fourth-century biography of Antony by Bishop Athanasius of Alexandria was hugely influential in creating an enduring model of sanctity Other works followed, such as Sulpicius Severas' Life of Martin of Tours, which became a "best-seller" in the West.
The first list of exactly the 27 books that would come to be our New Testament does not occur until 367, when Athanasius of Alexandria made reading recommendations to Christians under his pastoral care in Egypt.
The text of the Apostolos in Athanasius of Alexandria.
Athanasius of Alexandria, Gregory of Nazianzus, Ephrem the Syrian (4th c.
Eusebius of Vercelli numbered among this group, whose members also included Athanasius of Alexandria, Hilary of Poitiers, Liberius of Rome, Lucifer of Cagliari, and Dionysius of Milan.
Athanasius of Alexandria, a fourth-century theologian who was engaged in a foundational debate about how one ought to refer to God in the liturgy:
In his narrative, Philostorgius rejected Nicene theology and criticized famous Nicene champions such as Athanasius of Alexandria and Basil of Caesarea.