Atitlán

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Atitlán

(ätētlän`), volcanic lake, 53 sq mi (137 sq km), 17 mi (27.3 km) long and 11 mi (17.7 km) wide, SW Guatemala. One of the most magnificent lakes of Central America, it is set among lofty mountains with three inactive volcanoes nearby; Atitlán volcano (11,565 ft/3,525 m) is the tallest. The fertile lakeshore is densely populated by subsistence farmers. The principal towns on the lake, Santiago Atitlán, San Lucas Tolimán, and Panajachel, serve as centers of tourism and commercial activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have eight different lots of Guatemalan coffee right now including Huehuetenango, Acatenango, Atitlan, Chimaltenango and Antigua and they are all extraordinary coffees," said Howell, marveling over all the different cup qualities.
Now image one: I sometimes took seminary students with me to language school in Guatemala, and we usually went to the makeshift cemetery in Santiago Atitlan, where thirteen rough-hewn crosses bore the martyrs' names.
Even farmers in more humid areas, such as Cerro de Oro, overlooking Lake Atitlan, are struggling with unpredictable weather.
Lake Atitlan is one of the most beautiful places in the world.
Morales brings into evidence his theoretical deductions derived from his visits to an indigenous community in Santiago Atitlan where he notices the inevitable penetration of modern merchandise that supposedly rids indigenous culture of its specificity.
Over the years, rubbish, sewage and fertilizers have polluted Lake Atitlan and its surrounding bay.
In a transformation reminiscent of the mythical village of Brigadoon, more than 100 Cascade volunteers descend each March on a quiet college campus in this highlands city overlooking volcano-ringed Lake Atitlan.
After testing approximately 300 children in the Mayan communities around Lake Atitlan, I was quite familiar with ''mucho popo.
Cecilia Odet Gutierrez, 12, is a sixth-grader from San Lucas Toliman, a town of 13,000 people that borders Lake Atitlan.
The tour also visits volcano-flanked Lake Atitlan, thought to be the deepest lake in Central America (1,049 feet).
Since the visit, the public affairs section in Guatemala has sponsored 18 undergraduate scholarships for indigenous students at a local university and worked with Save the Children USA to provide educational materials and teacher training to assist 2,000 grade-schoolers in eight indigenous schools around Lake Atitlan.