Atlanta

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See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Atlanta

(ətlăn`tə, ăt–), city (1990 pop. 394,017), state capital and seat of Fulton co., NW Ga., on the Chattahoochee R. and Peachtree Creek, near the Appalachian foothills; inc. 1847. It is Georgia's largest city and one of the leading cities of the South.

Economy and Transportation

Manufactures include textiles, furniture, food and beverages, telecommunications hardware, steel, paper, and chemicals. There are automobile and aircraft assembly plants, insurance companies, and printing and publishing houses; and it is a major television broadcasting center. Atlanta is home to numerous corporations, notably Coca-Cola, founded here in 1892. The site of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, Atlanta is also a major convention center with many large hotels. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is one of the busiest in the world, and the city has a modern subway system.

Points of Interest

Notable sites include the capitol (1889), housing the state library; the city hall; the Woodruff Arts Center, home of the High Museum of Art and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra; the Fernbank Museum of Natural History; the state archives building; the building housing the huge Cyclorama of the Battle of Atlanta; Oakland Cemetery, containing Civil War dead; "Underground Atlanta," a four-block tract covered for 50 years by a viaduct system and restored as a tourist district; the Martin Luther King, Jr., National Historic Site, including King's birthplace and grave as well as Ebenezer Baptist Church, where he preached; Grant Park, with a zoo and Confederate Fort Walker (restored); and the Georgia Aquarium, National Center for Civil and Human Rights, and other attractions clustered around Centennial Olympic Park. The Carter Presidential Center (1986) contains a museum and library dedicated to former President Jimmy Carter as well as a forum (part of Emory Univ.) for the discussion of international issues.

Many departments of the federal government have branches in and near Atlanta, including the Centers for Disease Control and PreventionCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC), agency of the U.S. Public Health Service since 1973, with headquarters in Atlanta; it was established in 1946 as the Communicable Disease Center.
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; also there are Fort McPherson, headquarters of the U.S. 3d Army, and a naval air station. The Atlanta penitentiary (est. 1899) is one of the most widely known U.S. federal prisons. The city's numerous parks are famous for their dogwood blooms. Nearby is Stone Mountain Park, with enormous relief carvings of Confederate figures and a 19th-century plantation, reminiscent of the Atlanta depicted in the film Gone with the Wind (1939). Also in the area are Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park (see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
, table) and Six Flags Over Georgia, a large theme park.

Atlanta is the seat of Emory Univ., Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State Univ., Oglethorpe Univ., the Atlanta School of Art, and Atlanta Univ., with its adjacent and affiliated schools: Clark, Morehouse, Morris Brown, and Spelman colleges. The city is home to the Atlanta Braves (baseball), Falcons (football), and Hawks (basketball).

History

Hardy Ivy, the first settler, built (1833) a cabin on what had been Creek tribal land. The town, founded (1837) as Terminus, one end of the Western & Atlantic rail line, was incorporated as Marthasville in 1843 and renamed Atlanta in 1845. It became a rail and marketing hub and in the Civil War was a communication and supply center; it fell to Gen. W. T. Sherman on Sept. 2, 1864 (see Atlanta campaignAtlanta campaign,
May–Sept., 1864, of the U.S. Civil War. In the spring of 1864, Gen. W. T. Sherman concentrated the Union armies of G. H. Thomas, J. B. McPherson, and J. M. Schofield around Chattanooga.
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). Most of the city was burned on Nov. 15, before Sherman began his march to the sea. Rapidly rebuilt, it thrived as a commercial and industrial center, and became temporary (1868) and permanent (1877, following a popular vote) capital of Georgia. Conventions and expositions in the late 19th and early 20th centuries drew attention to the city's growth and strategic position. In 1973, Atlanta became the first major Southern city to elect an African American as mayor. By then it was already losing residents to its rapidly expanding suburbs; in the late 1990s the metropolitan area had a population close to 4 million, and "sprawl" had become a major concern.

Bibliography

See T. A. Hartshorn, Atlanta (1976) and H. H. Martin, Atlanta and Environs (1987).

Atlanta

a city in N Georgia: the state capital. Pop.: 423 019 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Neighborhood America's Public Comment Service will continue to support the BeltLine's online community and its efforts to engage Atlantans in the sustainable development of their city.
Deeply resenting civil-rights activism that resulted in the court-mandated desegregation of "their" public recreation facilities, schools, and transportation system, for example, white Atlantans in large numbers abandoned these services, not only by ceding them to blacks, but also by refusing to support them with their tax dollars and turning to their own white-only private institutions.
Atlantans know how to do business, but the city also has everything needed for a perfect getaway, even if it's just taking a break during a meeting--sports, dining, shopping, history, culture, attractions and more.
And ODE tackles larger community issues--everything from parks to landfills--as the only "non-faith" affiliate of Atlantans Building Leadership Empowerment (ABLE), a high-powered alliance of 23 area congregations.
A recent multi-city survey conducted by the polling company indicated that 43% of Atlantans, 46% of Bostonians, 51% of Chicagoans and 52% of Denverites think St.
But what they did this time against the Braves was a far more impressive accomplishment, considering the Atlantans were making their fifth World Series appearance this decade and had just come off a 103-victory regular season and an emotional NLCS triumph over the New York Mets.
It drove through Congress the Urban Mass Transit Act, which has given San Franciscans BART, Washingtonians Metro, Atlantans MARTA, and cities across America thousands of buses and modernized transit systems.
By all accounts so far, Atlantans agree with Britt Beemer, president of America's Research Group in Charleston, S.
Fashionable Atlantans are seen in every kind of social gathering except the kind where they're scrubbed and sober and fumbling in the hymnal for "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God.
Disfranchisement dramatically reduced the black vote but never erased it completely, and, as Bayor observes, black Atlantans who still could qualify to vote used what remained of their political strength to seek solutions to their continuing problems and grievances.
Atlantans will miss Mount's gift for the seriously funny quip, so perfectly timed one might hear rim-shots following them.
At about the same time, a small band of brash and influential Atlantans, not satisfied with their city's status as cynosure of the resurgent South, pushed Atlanta into the universal spotlight by bidding for the 1996 Summer Olympics.