atmospheric chemistry

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atmospheric chemistry

[¦at·mə¦sfir·ik ′kem·ə·strē]
(meteorology)
The study of the production, transport, modification, and removal of atmospheric constituents in the troposphere and stratosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the past, we've always seen ozone at some stratospheric altitudes go to zero by the end of September," said Bryan Johnson, NOAA atmospheric chemist.
In the 1970s, he and atmospheric chemist Richard Stolarski showed that chlorine could deplete stratospheric ozone, work that was cited in the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Paul Crutzen, Mario Molina, and F.
Susan Solomon, lead author of the study, and an atmospheric chemist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, told The New York Times.
There's an invisible concerto going on," says Jonathan Williams, an atmospheric chemist at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany.
More recently, James Lovelock, a British atmospheric chemist who was employed by NASA to study the atmospheres of Mars and Venus, developed a theory symbolized by Gaia, a goddess who personified earth for the ancient Greeks.
The Anthropocene is a concept/term originally developed by Dutch atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen, who won the Nobel Prize in 1995 for his work on the depletion of the ozone layer.
One kilogram of desflurane, for instance, is equivalent to 2,500 kilograms of carbon dioxide in terms of the amount of greenhouse warming potential, explained Martin Vollmer, an atmospheric chemist at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology in Dubendorf, Switzerland, who led the new study.
Stoermer and has been widely popularized by the Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, Paul Crutzen, who regards the influence of human behavior on the Earth's atmosphere in recent centuries as so significant as to constitute a new geological epoch for its lithosphere.
Putting sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere to cut the amount of incoming sunlight and reduce heating at the surface was first suggested by Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, in 2006.
An epoch ago (way back in the Holocene, circa 1999), the Nobel prize-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen realized that he was no longer living in that stable slice of Earth's history that started only 10,000 years ago.
2) The Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen dubbed this new age the "Anthropocene" era.
The conventional thinking is that brown clouds have masked as much as 50 percent of global warming by greenhouse gases through so-called global dimming," reports Veerabhadran Ramanathan, an atmospheric chemist at California's Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

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