atmospheric chemistry

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atmospheric chemistry

[¦at·mə¦sfir·ik ′kem·ə·strē]
(meteorology)
The study of the production, transport, modification, and removal of atmospheric constituents in the troposphere and stratosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stoermer and has been widely popularized by the Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, Paul Crutzen, who regards the influence of human behavior on the Earth's atmosphere in recent centuries as so significant as to constitute a new geological epoch for its lithosphere.
Putting sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere to cut the amount of incoming sunlight and reduce heating at the surface was first suggested by Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, in 2006.
Joseph Prospero, an atmospheric chemist at the University of Miami in Florida, agrees that the core's data match other climate records.
10, at NASA's Langley Research Center here, atmospheric chemist James Crawford will present, "Improving the View of Air Quality from Space," at 2 p.
An epoch ago (way back in the Holocene, circa 1999), the Nobel prize-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen realized that he was no longer living in that stable slice of Earth's history that started only 10,000 years ago.
Rain and weather wash out these particles from the atmosphere near Earth's surface," says Michael Mills, an atmospheric chemist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.
The conventional thinking is that brown clouds have masked as much as 50 percent of global warming by greenhouse gases through so-called global dimming," reports Veerabhadran Ramanathan, an atmospheric chemist at California's Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
It is somewhere between cold and really, really cold and you can't breathe up there," says Edward Dunlea, an atmospheric chemist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
NOBEL PRIZE-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen will be on the island next month to deliver a lecture on climate change and atmospheric chemistry.
Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany, said that the failure to cut emissions might force the world to reshape the environment through drastic use of technology.
Atmospheric chemist James Donaldson and colleagues at the University of Toronto found that when sunlight strikes grime, inactive nitrogen compounds may be transformed into active forms that become airborne.

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