Atomic Artillery

Atomic Artillery

 

artillery systems designed to fire at ground and naval targets with projectiles carrying conventional and chemical charges as well as nuclear charges. One of the first models of such a system was the 280-mm gun made in the USA. When this gun was tested at a site in Nevada in 1953, an atomic projectile with a mass of about 360 kg was fired. The atomic projectile exploded in the area of the target at a height of 150 m and at about 11 km from the firing position. The power of the explosion was equivalent to 15,000 tons of TNT. The guns that the US army uses to fire projectiles with atomic charges are the 203.2-mm howitzer, the 175-mm gun, and the 155-mm howitzer. Projectiles with atomic charges for several guns of other calibers are now being designed. It is thought that the combination of nuclear charges of great explosive power and artillery guns that deliver the charge to the target most efficiently will lead to radical changes in the combat capabilities of field artillery and will enable the most effective destruction of targets.

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Under Obama's costly security doctrine, the US is increasing spending across the board on its nuclear arsenal, including the refurbishment of various nuclear weapons programs, warheads, atomic demolition munitions, and atomic artillery shells run by the National Nuclear Security Administration.