Ionizing Radiation

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ionizing radiation

[′ī·ə‚niz·iŋ ‚rād·ē′ā·shən]
(nucleonics)
Particles or photons that have sufficient energy to produce ionization directly in their passage through a substance. Also known as ionization radiation.
Particles that are capable of nuclear interactions in which sufficient energy is released to produce ionization.

Ionizing Radiation

 

any radiation whose interaction with a medium ultimately leads to the ionization of atoms and molecules of the medium. Types of ionizing radiation include electromagnetic radiation, X rays, gamma radiation, and laser radiation, as well as fluxes of a-particles, electrons, positrons, protons, neutrons, and other neutral and charged particles. Charged particles ionize the atoms of the medium directly upon collision if their kinetic energy is sufficient for ionization. When neutral particles (neutrons) or photons (quanta of X rays or y-radiation) pass through the medium, ionization is brought about by the secondary charged particles that form from the interaction of the primary particles with the medium.

Ionizing radiation plays an important role in various physical and chemical processes and in biology, medicine, agriculture, and industry. Many chemical reactions take place more readily or at considerably lower temperatures and pressures under the influence of ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation is used in sterilization, pasteurization, and preservation of foods and pharmaceuticals. It produces various mutations in microorganisms and plants.

At the same time, ionizing radiation exerts a destructive ac-tion on matter. [10–1103-2; updated]

References in periodicals archive ?
United Nations Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, to the General Assembly.
Charlesby, Atomic Radiation and Polymers, Pergamon, Oxford (1960).
It's like reviving Frankenstein--this is the sequel," says Robert Alvarez, executive director of the Standing for Truth About Radiation (STAR) Foundation and co-author of Killing Our Own: The Disaster of America's Experience with Atomic Radiation.
Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and is the first American to be named chairman of the institute since its predecessor, the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, transformed itself into RERF in 1975.
The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and the British Radiological Society, among others, agree with Gofman.
Though not an American creature, this Japanese monster of metropolitan destruction certainly owed his existence to fears of atomic radiation, and would eventually become quite well known in the US, starting in the mid-1950s.
Recently I saw an episode where Agents Mulder and Scully were chasing around after this really disgusting slimy sewer-dwelling creature - caused, of course, by atomic radiation - that was partly human and partly lung fluke.
Norman Solomon and Eleanor Walters, of Killing Our Own: The Disaster of America's Experience With Atomic Radiation Dell).
While ending its story in 1962, Controlling the Atom provides the legislative and institutional bases for understanding the successes of America's peaceful atomic program (in the guise of almost one hundred constructed nuclear power plants and widespread use of atomic radiation in medicine and industry).
Following is UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moons video message on the sixtieth anniversary of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, in Vienna on 27 June.
Ionizing radiation is a known risk factor for cancer [United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2006].