Atropos


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Atropos

(ă`trəpŏs'): see FatesFates,
in Greek religion and mythology, three goddesses who controlled human lives; also called the Moerae or Moirai. They were: Clotho, who spun the web of life; Lachesis, who measured its length; and Atropos, who cut it.
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Atropos

Fate who cuts thread of life. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Hall, 302]
See: Death
References in periodicals archive ?
Atropos editor Mark Tunmore said: "Moth Night comes at a particularly exciting time this year following a long period of warm weather in July.
These descriptions are saturated with violent gazes: the Gorgons' snakes are glaring savagely ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 236); Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos competing over a dying man "glared terribly with their eyes at one another in their fury" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 262).
Hubertus von Amelunxen (New York: Atropos Press, 2009), 79.
Al escribir en el siglo VI, Fulgencio relaciona las tres Parcas con Pluton y desarrolla una etimologia del griego en la que Clitos significa la "citacion" del nacimiento, Lachesis, el "destino," y Atropos, lo "sin orden" (1.
Mae'r enw Atropa yn dod o Atropos, sef un o'r Tynghedau ym mytholeg Gwlad Groeg.
68) Here, near the start of the piece, despite the commonplace reference to Atropos, the Passe Compose implies that brother and sister do at least occupy the same "part of time" (Maupas) on one level; otherwise Du Vair would have had to use a Passe Simple (e.
The simile of moon as heart is overlaid with the metaphor of moon as a life hanging by a thread, though this divine heart is dead even without its thread being cut by Atropos.
Similarly, the atropines, a class of drugs that includes the extract of a plant commonly known as "deadly nightshade," derive their name from Atropos, the Greek god of fate who cut the thread of life (King & Voruganti, 2002).
pipe, Atropos measures breath into skeins of smoke, smoke to drift over
This beautifully designed book is a brown box with a white spine on which are printed "ANNE CARSON" and "NOX" The title teases the reader without giving anything away: for those with some Latin, the word is night, darkness, a primal goddess, death, nothingness and, in due course, the brother; in English NOX offers a concealed "NO" followed by the scissor-like "X" with which Atropos, one of the Fates, cuts our life's thread.
Butterfly Conservation, the Bat Conservation Trust, and Atropos - the journal for butterfly, moth and dragonfly enthusiasts - are also hoping to raise awareness among the public of the plight of nocturnal species.
When Iphigenia tells Ignatius the story of Lachesis, Clotho, and Atropos to explain the importance of spinning, she prefaces their names and respective tasks in ensuring each soul's destiny with, "Some say they are the trinity, not separate but three faces of the one" (Lambs 152).