attitude

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attitude

1. Aeronautics the orientation of an aircraft's axes in relation to some plane, esp the horizontal
2. Ballet a classical position in which the body is upright and one leg raised and bent behind

attitude

a learnt and enduring tendency to perceive or act towards persons or situations in a particular way.

The concept of attitude has provoked much consideration and investigation, both by psychologists and sociologists, as it incorporates individual and social aspects. Psychologists emphasize the conditions under which an individual develops attitudes and integrates them as part of the personality Social psychologists are particularly interested in the way attitudes function within a social Setting. Sociologists associate social behaviours with particular social structures and situations, e.g. class relations.

There is a variety of definitions of attitude (e.g. Allport, 1935; Haber and Fried, 1975; Rokeach, 1960), some imply that holding an attitude leads to behaving in a certain way, others encompass the idea that an attitude may only exist mentally, since overt behaviour can be constrained situationally It is therefore useful to see attitudes as involving three elements:

  1. a cognitive component – beliefs and ideas;
  2. an affective component – values and emotions;
  3. a behavioural component -predisposition to act and actions (Secord and Backman, 1964).

Attitude

 

the state of subjective readiness or predisposition to a given activity in a given situation. Attitudes were first identified in 1888 by the German psychologist L. Lange, who was studying errors of perception. The Soviet psychologist D. N. Uznadze, in working out a general psychological theory of attitudes, presented experimental proof of an individual subject’s general mental readiness to respond to a need activated in a given situation (actual attitudes). Furthermore, Uznadze determined the laws governing the reinforcement of such a state of readiness through the repeated recurrence of situations in which the given need can be satisfied (fixed attitudes). According to Uznadze, attitudes accumulate past experiences and thus mediate the stimulating effect of external conditions, creating a balance between the subject and the environment.

Social attitudes have been the subject of research in the USSR (Sh. Nadirashvili and I. Gomelauri) as well as abroad, where social psychologists (for example, F. Heider, S. Asch, M. Rosenberg, and L. Festinger in the USA) attribute a fixed set of mental attitudes to the individual in relation to society. Such studies have revealed the complex structure of social attitudes, whose components are classified as affective, cognitive, and behavioral (the latter describing readiness for action)—that is, forms of perceptual and behavioral predisposition with respect to social objects and situations. It is presumably possible to distinguish, in the structure of the psyche, a hierarchical system of predispositions to action on various levels of regulation of conduct. This organized system of predispositions consists of the following categories: the most simple and unconscious attitudes toward the simplest situations and objects; the more complex social attitudes that govern social conduct; and the individual’s value orientations, which are products of the interaction between higher social needs and circumstances and which mediate the individual’s overall social behavior in different spheres of activity.

REFERENCES

Uznadze, D. N. Eksperimental’nye osnovy psikhologii ustanovki. Tbilisi, 1961.
Uznadze, D. N. Psikhologicheskie issledovaniia. Moscow, 1966.
Nadirashvili, Sh. A. Poniatie ustanovki v obshchei i sotsial’noi psikhologii. Tbilisi, 1974.
Prangishvili, A. S. Issledovaniia po psikhologii ustanovki. Tbilisi, 1967.
Shikhirev, P. N. “Issledovaniia sotsial’noi ustanovki v SShA.” Voprosy filosofii, 1973, no. 2.
Iadov, V. A. “O dispozitsionnoi reguliatsii sotsial’nogo povedeniia lichnosti.” In the collection Metodologicheskie problemy sotsial’noi psikhologii. Moscow, 1975.
Attitude Organization and Change. New Haven, 1960.
Rokeach, M. “The Nature of Attitudes.” In International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, vol. 1. New York, 1968.
McGuire, W. J. “The Nature of Attitudes and Attitude Change.” In Handbook of Social Psychology, vol. 3. Reading, 1968.

V. A. IADOV

attitude

[′ad·ə‚tüd]
(aerospace engineering)
The position or orientation of an aircraft, spacecraft, and so on, either in motion or at rest, as determined by the relationship between its axes and some reference line or plane or some fixed system of reference axes.
(geology)
The position of a structural surface feature in relation to the horizontal.
(graphic arts)
The orientation of a camera or a photograph with respect to a given external reference system.

attitude

The angle between the horizontal and the longitudinal axis of an aircraft whether on the ground or when airborne. Climbing attitude, level attitude, flying attitude, and descending attitude are some of the terms that indicate attitude of the aircraft.
References in classic literature ?
Haigha replied eagerly, coming in front of Alice to introduce her, and spreading out both his hands towards her in an Anglo-Saxon attitude.
And again the boat appeared and the Fay, but about the attitude of the latter there was more of care and uncertainty and less of elastic joy.
The carelessness of her attitude seemed to him rather masculine than feminine.
Peevishness, complaints, exacting cross-examination she was used to, but this attitude of composed quiet, which seemed to come from the consciousness of power within, puzzled her.
There had been no indication in von Horn's attitude toward the girl that he loved her.
There was a certain rude, though chivalrous grandeur in the act; and it marked not only the beginning of a lifelong devotion and loyalty on the part of Shandy toward his young master, but was prophetic of the attitude which Norman of Torn was to inspire in all the men who served him during the long years that saw thousands pass the barbicans of Torn to crave a position beneath his grim banner.
Brewer, who had observed them at the same moment, was leaning forward in an attitude of rapt attention, horribly pale.
But the permanent interest of his thirty years of political life consists chiefly in his share in the three great questions, roughly successive in time, of what may be called England's foreign policy, namely the treatment of the English colonies in America, the treatment of the native population of the English empire in India, and the attitude of England toward the French Revolution.
And now - well, I find even your attitude a little difficult to understand.
But when Love heard that awful confession from Beauty that she was married already, he bounced up from his attitude of humility on the carpet, uttering exclamations which caused poor little Beauty to be more frightened than she was when she made her avowal.
Moreover, his attitude to Kitty in the past--the attitude of a grown-up person to a child, arising from his friendship with her brother--seemed to him yet another obstacle to love.
James Harthouse continued to lounge in the same place and attitude, smoking his cigar in his own easy way, and looking pleasantly at the whelp, as if he knew himself to be a kind of agreeable demon who had only to hover over him, and he must give up his whole soul if required.

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