attraction

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attraction

a force by which one object attracts another, such as the gravitational or electrostatic force
References in classic literature ?
I extolled her beauty, her gaiety, her wit, so warmly, that my praises excited in him a desire to see a damsel adorned by such attractions.
One after another, the girls yielded to the attraction of the wonderful lace.
Lord Montbarry declared that she was the only perfectly pretty woman he had ever seen, who was really unconscious of her own attractions.
Among the operatic attractions of that year--I am writing of the days when the ballet was still a popular form of public entertainment--there was a certain dancer whose grace and beauty were the objects of universal admiration.
I confess, whether beautiful or plain,--not too plain,--women who earn their own living have a peculiar attraction for me.
By a Law of Nature with us, there is a constant attraction to the South; and, although in temperate climates this is very slight -- so that even a Woman in reasonable health can journey several furlongs northward without much difficulty -- yet the hampering effect of the southward attraction is quite sufficient to serve as a compass in most parts of our earth.
The Spectacle has, indeed, an emotional attraction of its own, but, of all the parts, it is the least artistic, and connected least with the art of poetry.
Not since that other March night in 1866, when I had stood without that Arizona cave in which my still and lifeless body lay wrapped in the similitude of earthly death had I felt the irresistible attraction of the god of my profession.
I suspected that Blanche Stroeve's violent dislike of Strickland had in it from the beginning a vague element of sexual attraction.
It had been an irresistible attraction before ever his eyes opened and looked upon it.
If they continued to sing like their great predecessor of romantic themes, they were drawn as by a kind of magnetic attraction into the Homeric style and manner of treatment, and became mere echoes of the Homeric voice: in a word, Homer had so completely exhausted the epic genre, that after him further efforts were doomed to be merely conventional.
at the instant that the attraction of the moon exactly counterpoises that of the earth; that is to say at 47/52 of its passage.