acoustic feedback

(redirected from Audio feedback)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

acoustic feedback

[ə′küs·tik ′fēd‚bak]
(engineering acoustics)
The reverberation of sound waves from a loudspeaker to a preceding part of an audio system, such as to the microphone, in such a manner as to reinforce, and distort, the original input. Also known as acoustic regeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Visual and audio feedback was used for communication between the collaborators.
Clients can now customize IB's desktop TWS platform to provide audio feedback for all key actions in their native language.
As if that weren't enough, Blanco's set was peppered with audio feedback.
The company has developed wearable technology trackers like 'smart bands' and 'stride sensors,' that are powered by a virtual health coach which provides real-time audio feedback and interactive health coaching, depending on the activity and lifestyle of the user.
Endomondo helps plan participants track workouts, but it also provides audio feedback on those workouts, with helpful advice.
Using a multiple probe across participants design, the effectiveness of asynchronous audio feedback was assessed on the story revision behavior of six 6th grade students with emotional/behavioral disorders in a residential facility in southeastern U.
The prize-winning project 'EyeSee', created by a team of students from the UOWD, uses ultrasonic technology to detect obstacles and notify the user via audio feedback when they are outdoors.
Both instructors provided written feedback, and the Russian instructor provided audio feedback (teaching presence).
The company produces the Myoguide Needle EMG Guided Injection System, which it said gives practitioners a superior way to deliver targeted injections, by using the patient's muscle signals to provide ongoing visual and audio feedback during the needle insertion, to help find focal areas responsible for pain and spasticity.
Treadmills and elliptical machines come with audio feedback that can provide motivation or distraction.
Imagine navigating around a city without having to look at your phone or listen to audio feedback," Lawrence says.