Auger electron spectroscopy


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Auger electron spectroscopy

[ō′zhā i′lek‚trän spek′träs·kə·pē]
(spectroscopy)
The energy analysis of Auger electrons produced when an excited atom relaxes by a radiationless process after ionization by a high-energy electron, ion, or x-ray beam. Abbreviated AES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) is a surface sensitive analysis method for determining the elemental composition of solid materials.
In surface experiments such as Auger electron spectroscopy or x-ray fluorescence, the energetic particle is an electron.
used a sophisticated technique known as X-ray-excited Auger electron spectroscopy to investigate in detail the arrangement of electrons in molecules of these explosives.
The delivery system is a complete characterization of solid surfaces methods of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) and scanning electron microscopy with spin polarization detection of secondary electrons.
Upcoming articles will detail Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).
Surface analyzers consist of dynamic SIMS (D-SIMS), time-of-flight SIMS (TOF-SIMS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA).
Surface techniques can be of two-types: ex situ methods (where samples are removed from solution or a reaction vessel and placed in ultra-high vacuum systems), such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in situ methods, such as infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy, Table 1 shows a summary of the first three techniques together with the information they provide.