Augustan

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Augustan

1. characteristic of, denoting, or relating to the Roman emperor Augustus Caesar (63 bc--14 ad), his period, or the poets, notably Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, writing during his reign
2. of, relating to, or characteristic of any literary period noted for refinement and classicism, esp the late 17th century in France (the period of the dramatists Corneille, Racine, and Molière) or the 18th century in England (the period of Swift, Pope, and Johnson, much influenced by Dryden)
3. an author in an Augustan Age
4. a student of or specialist in Augustan literature
References in periodicals archive ?
Before turning to Four Quartets, he identifies the Augustans, specifically Dryden and Pope, as Eliot's precursors in the verse essay.
The relevance seems to be that the Augustan poems show that it is possible for a great poem to be a philosophical essay, and that the Augustan masters construct works that illustrate the via media in art, religion, and politics.
18 /PRNewswire/ -- Taking Control of Your Diabetes (TCOYD) announced findings today from a recent survey conducted by national research firm Yankelovich that found that more than one in five Augustans with type 2 diabetes mistakenly think that excess weight has a positive effect on the disease.
Survey findings also revealed that the recession is taking a negative toll on how Augustans manage their diabetes.
the place of Apollo in Augustan propaganda and the way he is presented by the poets".
Apollo in Augustan Poetry: The Augustan Poets' Use of a Contemporary Propaganda Theme.
The Gradus ad Parnassum (steps to the Muses), a dictionary of prosody and poetical phrases used in English schools to teach Latin versification, suggests not only the Latin poets who were widely translated in the eighteenth century and inspired a great deal of Augustan verse, but also the carefully planned steps that lead Gradus to kill the poet Shade.
In particular, Austen's wit and polish often draw comparisons to the major satirists of the Augustan age.
O'Neill summarizes the violence at the heart of Augustan satire well when he notes:
But it isn't only Middleton's interest in female roles and market forces which has made his work so responsive to contemporary interests - and which, disappointingly for readers of Steen's book, made him so comparatively inaccessible to the Augustans and Victorians with whom she largely deals.
Thus the gusto and vigor of the Elizabethans have been seen as continuing in Milton and the other seventeenth-century masters of baroque prose, then as being passed along to the early Augustans who brought the native energy of language under control without extinguishing it.
Dryden was the earliest born, in 1631, of the great Augustan prose writers and died just as the new century began.