Augustinians

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Related to Augustinian Hermits: Augustinian order, Augustinian Friars

Augustinians,

religious order in the Roman Catholic Church. The name derives from the Rule of St. Augustine (5th cent.?), which established rules for monastic observance and common religious life. The canons regular, made up of ordained clergy, adopted this rule in the 11th cent. and became known as Augustinian, or Austin, canons. Augustinian canons pursue a life of poverty, celibacy, and obedience without withdrawing from the world. Subsequent orders of canons regular, such as the Premonstratensians, are outgrowths of the Augustinians. The Austin friars are an entirely different group of religious, dating from the 13th cent. (see friarfriar
[Lat. frater=brother], member of certain Roman Catholic religious orders, notably, the Dominicans, Franciscans, Carmelites, and Augustinians. Although a general form of address in the New Testament, since the 13th cent.
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). Officially known as Hermits of St. Augustine, they now exist in three independent branches—the Calced Augustinian Hermits, the more austere and less numerous Discalced Augustinian Hermits, and the Recollects of St. Augustine. There are also congregations of women corresponding to both canons and friars.
References in periodicals archive ?
Giles seems to have become convinced, even in those early days, that the wild theories of the radical Franciscans represented a threat not only to the mendicant orders, including his own Augustinian Hermits, but also to the stability of the entire Church militant.
The death of this great figure, who had been Archpriest of Santa Maria Maggiore, Protector of the Augustinian Hermits, and Archbishop of Rouen, foreshadows the actions and motivations of high churchmen of the sixteenth century churchmen in whose interests it might have been to extinguish his long, Gallic shadow.
Kaspar Elm underscored the importance of the Augustinian hermits to the development of humanism in the fourteenth century.