Aulis


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Aulis

(ô`lĭs), small port of ancient Greece, in Boeotia, E central Greece. From there the Greek fleet sailed against Troy after the sacrifice of IphigeniaIphigenia
, in Greek legend, daughter of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon. When the Greek ships were delayed by contrary winds at Aulis en route to the Trojan War, Calchas informed Agamemnon that Artemis demanded the sacrifice of his daughter Iphigenia.
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. Its ancient temple of Artemis is in ruins.

Aulis

an ancient town in E central Greece, in Boeotia: traditionally the harbour from which the Greeks sailed at the beginning of the Trojan war
References in periodicals archive ?
This book contains the last four plays of Euripides: Electra, Phoenician Women, Bacchae, and Iphigenia at Aulis translated into English by Luschnig (classics, U.
Leiviska is fond of quoting his revered professor Aulis Blomstedt, who believed that 'locating the building on the site is the key issue .
In the eighth version of this mini-festival, Theater Without Boarders, the group that won last year's award, presented an adaptation of Euripides's Greek play "Iphigenia in Aulis.
71) As far as Hydaspes' predicament, the closest parallel is Agamemnon in Iphigenia in Aulis.
According to Segal: 'Like Iphigenia in the Aulis, to whom she is often compared, Polyxena proves to be the ideal victim: she makes no appeal to her suppliant status, offers no resistance (342-45), and submissively acquiesces in serving and enhancing with her body the honor of a warrior.
Aulis Olavi "Ollie" Manninen of Gardner finished 24th in the marathon at the London Olympics in 1948, but he's better known for what he did three years earlier during World War II.
Marina Carr's By the Bog of Cats (1998) reworks Euripides's Medea; her Ariel (2002) draws on the successive murders in the family of Atreus, as portrayed in Euripides's Iphigenia in Aulis, Orestes, and Electra, and in Aeschylus's Oresteia.
This is not to say that there are not some intriguing elements here, including a discussion of the performance of Jane Lumley's Iphigenia at Aulis (1557) at Nonsuch in 1559 for Elizabeth I that examines its use of Diana's grove near Nonsuch's banqueting house to suggest the performance's possible role in fashioning "the cult of Diana so central to Elizabeth's iconography" (77).
I found especially helpful her demonstration that the Fourth Gospel presents the death of Jesus as the beautiful death of a hero, through an insightful comparison with Iphigenia at Aulis.
Aulis, a view across the plain of Euboea, by Carl Rottmann (1797-1850), an important representative of 'heroic' landscape painting, also fetched 200,000 [euro], after a fierce bidding battle.
57) The theme is essentially that of Euripides' surviving play, Iphigeneia at Aulis.