Aulus Gellius


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Aulus Gellius:

see Gellius, AulusGellius, Aulus
, fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive).
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Gellius, Aulus

(jĕl`yəs), fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive). The work is chiefly valuable as a storehouse of quotations from lost works.
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His appearance in Aulus Gellius, however, who praises Peregrinus' moral teaching (Gell.
The volume deals with four Greek authors (Pindar, Aelianus Tacticus, Musaeus, and Agathias) and a Latin one, Aulus Gellius.
Aulus Gellius, in the Nodes atticae, writes: Quo primum tempore a praetoribus Lectus in indices sum, ut iudicia quae appellantur privata susciperem, libros utriusque linguae de officio iudicis scriptos conquisivi, ut homo adulescens a poetarum fabulis eta rhetorum epilogis ad iudicandas lites vocatus rem iudiciariam, quoniam vocis, ut dicitur, vivae penuria erat, ex mutis, quod aiunt, magistris cognoscerem (14.
Aulus Gellius was a Latin author and grammarian of the second century AD.
After that, the Latin grammarian Aulus Gellius translated these terms into naturalis and positivus (two terms from which most European cultures and languages derived the words that Western legal thought uses to describe two kinds of law).
Chrysippus' account of human action in Aulus Gellius, Noctes atticae, 7.
The Roman law on debt, according to the first-century legal historian, Aulus Gellius, ruled that a debtor unable to pay his bond would be imprisoned for a period of sixty days, after which rime he could be condemned to death and/or his body quartered and distributed among the creditors if they so wished.
133) Titus Livius (134) also uses the word "nation" in his famous Ab Urbe condita to refer to nationes Histrorum et Illyiorum, as does Aulus Gellius a century later, in his Attic Nights, (135) along with many other classical authors.
of Oklahoma) has excerpted the collection of observations by ancient Roman nobleman Aulus Gellius to serve as a grammar text for second-year Latin classrooms.
The balance of invention and tradition from the epistle to Arguijo ("ni es bien escribir por terminos tan inauditos") recurs in Lope's criticism of Gongora's excessive obscurity and ambiguity, which is best exemplified by his citation of Aulus Gellius who condemns words that are nova, incognita and inaudita:
Other sources: Marcus Aurelius: 'what I learned from Fronto'; Dio Cassius; Artemidorus; Aulus Gellius
In a similar vein, Udall himself frequently refers to texts by Pliny, Cicero, Suetonius, Plautus, and Aulus Gellius, all of which were favored by Claymond.