Austerlitz


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Austerlitz

(ô`stərlĭts, Ger. ou`–), Czech Slavkov u Brna, town, S Czech Republic, in Moravia. An agricultural center, the town has sugar refineries and cotton mills. It became a seat of the Anabaptists in 1528. At Austerlitz, in the "battle of the three emperors," Napoleon I won (Dec. 2, 1805) his most brilliant victory by defeating the Russian and Austrian armies under Czar Alexander I and Emperor Francis II. The "sun of Austerlitz" (it was a cloudless day) became synonymous with the peak of Napoleon's fortunes. An armistice with Austria, concluded (Dec. 4) at Nikolsburg (now Mikulov), was followed by the Treaty of Pressburg. Russia continued the war but had to withdraw all troops from Austria. There is a famous description of the battle in Tolstoy's War and Peace. The town has an 18th-century castle, a 13th-century church, the Renaissance Church of the Resurrection, and the Monument of Peace (built 1910–11).

Austerlitz

Napoleon’s brilliant success over Austro-Russian coalition (1805). [Fr. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 23–24]
See: Battle

Austerlitz

defeat of Austro-Russian coalition by Napoleon (1805). [Fr. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 23–24]
See: Defeat

Austerlitz

a town in the Czech Republic, in Moravia: site of Napoleon's victory over the Russian and Austrian armies in 1805. Pop.: 4747 (latest est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The metallic coating of the Vendome monument had a special significance, for it was made from 130 recycled Austrian and Russian cannons that had been captured at Austerlitz and, probably, on other battlefields won on the 1805 campaign.
For instance, his eponymous character Austerlitz reports that reading Balzac's short novel Le colonel Chabert--a story in which a hero of the Napoleonic wars, believed dead on the fields of the battle of Eylau, comes back to Paris twelve years later in post-Napoleonic times to claim his property and his wife (now happily married to another)--"reinforced the suspicion I had always entertained that the border between life and death is less impermeable than we commonly think" (Austerlitz 395).
This essay argues that Marpeck's activity as an Anabaptist leader--or, more precisely, the two documented phases of his activity from 1528 to 1532 and from 1540 to 1556--should be understood as part of a larger effort to establish an Anabaptist "church" initiated by the Anabaptist congregation in Austerlitz (Slavkov u Brna) in Moravia, also known as the "Austerlitz Brethren," whose early history from 1528 to 1531 played an important role in the narrative of the Hutterite chronicles.
Alan Itkin and Margaret Bruzelius, in "'Eine Art zur Unterwelt': Katabasis in Austerlitz" and "Adventure, Imprisonment, and Melancholy: Heart of Darkness and Die Ringe des Saturn," respectively, make similar judgments: that in Austerlitz "there can be no true nostos, or homecoming" (Itkin 162) and that in Sebald generally "tale-telling loses whatever redemptive or integrative function it may once have had" (Bruzelius 248).
Ann Austerlitz dubbed the young duo "Astaire" at the suggestion of a dance teacher, in order to evoke "a star" or, according to Epstein, "a stairway, perhaps one leading to Paradise.
Paul Austerlitz seeks to thicken this well-seasoned stew further with Jazz Consciousness: Music, Race, and Humanity, which takes jazz's multivalence as a foundational premise.
15) Carhart examines the actions of several notable commanders--Hannibal at Cannae, King Frederick at Leuthen, and Napoleon at Austerlitz.
On December 2, 1805, he out-maneuvered a larger force of Russian and Austrian troops near the village of Austerlitz (OH-stur-lits), in today's Czech Republic.
Napoleon's attack on Austrian forces at Ulm paved the way for further victories culminating in his carefully planned and stunning victory at Austerlitz.
Szirtes's later long poem "Meeting Austerlitz," (2) first published in 2002, extends his engagement with Sebald by offering an extended meditation on Sebald's death.
On a more expository level, the eponymous protagonist in Austerlitz suggests a postulate concerning the atemporality of illness and misfortune:
His alter-ego Jacques Austerlitz describes himself, shortly before the end of Sebald's very last book, as "thinking I was about to die of the weak heart I have inherited, from whom I do not know.