Austronesian

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Austronesian

(ôs'trōnē`zhən, –shən), name sometimes used for the Malayo-Polynesian languagesMalayo-Polynesian languages
, sometimes also called Austronesian languages
, family of languages estimated at from 300 to 500 tongues and understood by approximately 300 million people in Madagascar; the Malay Peninsula; Indonesia and New Guinea; the Philippines;
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References in periodicals archive ?
It promotes the current consensus, approaching unmerited status of dogma, on an Austronesian homeland on Taiwan.
It is wrong to suggest that outrigger canoe craft first arrived with the Austronesian migrations, nor were the Polynesians the first people to introduce 'sail driven canoes suitable for cross-ocean voyages'.
At one level, this is certainly so, as hunter-gatherers were present in Borneo long before rice agriculture and the coming of the Austronesians.
Rapongan was born and raised in Pongso no Tau, the home island of the Tau people, located forty kilometers southeast of Taiwan, where people continue to live close to their oceanic tradition, which is part of the larger Austronesian culture.
As we know that the Austronesian language family is one of the largest language families in the world.
In the Palauan view, their origins were rather more marvelous, given that, as Richard Parmentier reports, 'there is an important connection in Belau, as elsewhere in the Austronesian world, between the notion of foreign provenience and sacred power' (1987:39).
The people of the Austronesian language family lived near the ocean and were very mobile," said Chen.
Now the aboriginal people still able to speak their Austronesian dialects are about 2 percent of Taiwan's 23 million population.
But traditionally, Papua New Guineans speak 820 languages belonging to two language groups: the Austronesians and the Papuans
the Austronesians had colonized every corner of the Polynesian triangle and all the archipelagos in between.
Other authors, however, maintain that the Austronesians were technically unable to make a 2,485 mi (4,000 km) voyage without a single stop, suggesting instead that they went along the Indian coastline, following the North Equatorial current.
Until 2013, tourists have had no public transport to avail of - just small Elf trucks that take them to places of interest, such as the view deck on Mount Caroboban and the Torongan Cave, where the first wave of Austronesians landed some 4,000 years ago in their migration toward the Pacific islands from Formosa.