Autolycus


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Related to Autolycus: Tydeus

Autolycus

(ôtŏl`ĭkəs), fl. 4th cent. B.C., astronomer and mathematician of Pitane in Aeolis. Of his two extant works, that on the revolving sphere is said to be the oldest completely preserved Greek treatise on a mathematical subject. The other deals with the apparent rising and setting of the fixed stars.

Autolycus,

in Greek mythology, the son of Hermes, from whom he received special powers in thieving and trickery. According to one legend Autolycus stole from Sisyphus, who revenged himself by seducing Autolycus' daughter Anticlea, who was Odysseus' mother.

Autolycus

craftiest of thieves; stole neighbors’ flocks by changing marks. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 192]
See: Cunning

Autolycus

master robber. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 96]
References in periodicals archive ?
The playwright also drew extensively from The Second Part of Conny-Catching (1592) in the sheep-shearing scenes and in the character of Autolycus, as well as from Pandosto.
Slightly less speculative, however, is a second tier of proposed parts: the First Clown or gravedigger in Hamlet (singing role), both Tnersites and Pandarus in Troilus and Cressida (the latter a singing role), Pompey in Measure for Measure, the Clown in Othello, the Porter in Macbeth, the Clown in Antony and Cleopatra, and Autolycus in The Winter's Tale (singing role).
In one scene, Autolycus, a villain, talks about a ballad that includes the lyrics, "It was thought she was a woman, and was turned into a cold fish.
Associate artistic director Pete Pryor performed the role of Autolycus as a growling emcee reminiscent of Tom Waits, wandering the audience with a microphone.
It is the restoration of faith in grace and in personal bonds that I explore in this essay, focusing not on Leontes but instead on the rogue character Autolycus whose action is central to reuniting the kingdoms.
In an urban street men could, and did, turn to the nearest wall; the country equivalent was the hedge, on which Autolycus looks (The Winter's Tale, 4.
Without recourse to a footnote, the poet and translator Robert Fitzgerald captures its word play in the story in Book 19 of the Odyssey of how he was named by his grandfather Autolycus.
Last Quarter Moon Last Quarter lunar features Craters 1 Maginus 2 Clavius 3 Tycho * 4 Gassendi 5 Grimaldi * 6 Landsberg 7 Encke 8 Kepler * 9 Aristarchus 10 Bianchini 11 Pythagoras 12 Plato * 13 Aristillus 14 Autolycus 15 Archimedes 16 Timocharis * 17 Eratosthenes 18 Copernicus * 19 Herschel 20 Ptolemaeus 21 Albategnius 22 Alphonsus 23 Arzachel Mountains CM Carpathians HM Harbinger RM Riphaeus SB Spitzbergen StR Straight Range SW Straight Wall TM Teneriffe Other features MF Mare Frigoris MH Mare Humorum MI Mare Imbrium MN Mare Nubium OP Oceanus Procellarum PE Palus Epidemiarum SA Sinus Aestuum SI Sinus Iridum SR Sinus Roris Table 2.
Those familiar with Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale will recall the ballad seller Autolycus singing similar words as he exits: 'Jog on, Jog on, the footpath way.
3 feeding the baby a bottle and even placing her on his shoulder to be burped, and Ethan Hawke's Autolycus conning the young shepherd in 4.
The Winter's Tale', by contrast, in Paulina, shows loyal service properly acknowledged in the play's denouement--a contrast emphasised even more by the juxtaposition with Autolycus rejoicing in, and flaunting, his masterless condition.
Xenophon's Symposium by contrast consists in a witty contest between Socrates and Callias at a feast given by Callias for his eromenus ('beloved'; adolescent boy aged 12-17) Autolycus and his father.