Avellaneda


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Avellaneda

(ävāyänā`thä), city (1991 pop. 346,620), Buenos Aires prov., E central Argentina, across the Riachuelo River from the Buenos Aires federal district. It is one of the most important industrial, commercial, and transportation centers in the country. The city, which grew in the first half of the 19th cent., was formerly called Barracus al Sur but was renamed (1904) after Nicolás Avellaneda, an Argentine president. Migrants demonstrated in Juan Peron's behalf in 1945; they requested that he return from exile.
References in periodicals archive ?
com Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences Contact: Marco Avellaneda avellane@cims.
In return it reflects poorly on business owners who attempt to sell their concept, product or service to Alaskans," Avellaneda said.
Furthermore, Avellaneda had on his shoulders the largest loan in the country's history, contracted by former president Sarmiento.
CUTLINE: (1) Tom Dolan, Pete Allen and Ned Eames (2) Leslie Graham, Jeff Barr, Joe Durkin, Suzanne Durkin and Philip Barry (3) Kevin Wright, Brenda Wright, Gregory Wright, Jennifer Lebeaux (4) Alvin Kouassi and Lynn Kouassi (5) Tomie George, Ellen Barry, Timothy Barry and Marisol Avellaneda (6) Paulin Kouassi with Lucas and Kayla Kouassi
In the spot, a young man in plain clothes watches shoppers stroll by in Alto Avellaneda, a mall on the southern outskirts of Buenos Aires.
On the French and Cuban side, the Countess of Merlin and Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda offer migration narratives and reflections that are comparable in some ways to the novels under scrutiny in this essay.
My father was a passionate fan of the Diablos Rojos and I remember him telling me about the exploits of his countryman, Erico, the Paraguayan forward who brought so much glory to this team from Avellaneda in the nineteen-forties.
Though small in scale and located in Alvarez's and Stuby's unfashionable suburb Avellaneda, El Basilisco has had an impact worldwide as a successful artist-run space functioning outside established channels.
President Avellaneda was under great preassure to default on the loans.
In 1856, when the university fell under the administration of the national government after the period of Jesuit and Franciscan control, UNC faculty members began a tradition of anti-secularism and nepotism that continued even after 1885 when the Avellaneda Law gave the university the right to govern itself without state intervention.
Paraguay 264, Avellaneda, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina
In 1853, under President Justo Jose de Urquiza and then continuing under Presidents Bartolome Mitre, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, and Nicholas Avellaneda, Argentina experienced a 30 year period of institution building.