avulsion

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avulsion

[ə′vəl·shən]
(hydrology)
A sudden change in the course of a stream by which a portion of land is cut off, as where a stream cuts across and forms an oxbow.
(medicine)
Tearing one part away from the other, either by trauma or surgery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brachial plexus avulsion injury (BPAI) represents one of the most devastating injuries of the upper extremity, and nerve transfer is the most frequently used method in restoring upper limb function for such serious lesion.
Although less common than strain injuries at the myotendinous junction, complete rupture or avulsion of the proximal hamstring tendons from the ischial tuberosity is a serious injury that may cause chronic pain, loss of strength, and functional disability.
Knowledge of medical hospital emergency pshysicians about the first-aid management of traumatic tooth avulsion.
Initial report on the limited value of hypoglossal nerve transfer to treat brachial plexus root avulsions.
And when compared with healthy individuals, these injuries clearly signal that repetitive spinal trauma is a unique risk factor for the disease (especially when it produces some type of spinal motor neuron constriction and or avulsion upon reinjury).
There was some difficulty with ureteral dilatation and UPJ avulsion of the ureter was suspected associated with insertion of the ureteral access sheath.
But avulsion fractures of tibial intercondylar eminence is a rare injury mainly affecting the pediatric population between 8 to 14 and is even rarer in adults with very few cases reported in literature.
He had experienced a bike accident that resulted in the avulsion of his maxillary left central and lateral incisor and incisal edge fracture of maxillary right central and lateral incisors.
This patient has Jersey finger, caused by a traumatic avulsion of the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) from the distal phalanx and diagnosed based on the mechanism of injury and the patient's inability to flex the DIP joint.
In that section, I shall outline the historical distinction between alluvion, or gradual changes, and avulsion, or radical changes, and explain the strong efficiency characteristics of the classical rules as they apply to property owners of both riparian and littoral interests.
Regarding their experience with tooth avulsions thirty four (34%) answered affirmative.