Aksum

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Aksum

or

Axum

(both: äkso͞om`), town (1994 pop. 27,148), Tigray region, N Ethiopia. Aksum was the capital of an empire (c.1st–8th cent. A.D.) that controlled much of what is now N Ethiopia. In the 4th cent. the emperor Ezana was converted to Christianity, and today Aksum is a major center of Ethiopian Christianity. The Ark of the Covenant is said to have been brought there from Jerusalem in Solomon's time and placed in the church of St. Mary of Zion, where Ethiopia's emperors were later crowned. The town is also noted for its gigantic carved pre-Christian obelisks, and there is an extensive underground royal necropolis.
References in periodicals archive ?
He believes that the Axumite texts are by no means straightforward, and that the Noba and Khasa, mentioned in these inscriptions cannot be identified with certainty, and doubts Burstein's belief that Meroe had become a vassal of Axum (Burstein 1981:47-50 [= Burstein 1995:207-211]).
It is also quite impossible to cast doubt on the Axumite invasions, since Axumite inscriptions were found at Meroe itself.
Kirwan 1937:47-48; Vantini 1981:24-25; Zacharopoulou 2010:313-314) In the beginning of the 4th century, the Axumite king Ezana who conquered Meroe or a part of it, speaks about the 'Red Noba' and the 'Black Noba'.
100) On Axumite missionary efforts in southwest Arabia, see J.
George Hatke's forthcoming Princeton dissertation, "Africans in Arabia Felix: Aksumite Relations with South Arabia, 300-600," argues forcefully for the primary role of Syrian rather than Axumite Christianity in the Christianization of South Arabia.
The Axumite kingdom was described by a third century Persian writer as one of the four great kingdoms of the world, the others being Persia, China and Rome.
And available historical records bring to light the fact that the initiation of the state took shape in the northern part centuries before the birth of Christ with the formation of the Axumite kingdom.
The late Roman pottery possibly reached south of Ras Hafun with Axumite or Persian traders.
Revival began from the 4th century; most merchandise of the Eastern world was largely under the control of Levantines, South Arabians and Axumites (Sidebotham 1991: 34; Curtin 1984: 90-96).
the Oromos do not have an Axumite history to glorify: they do not have
The Oromo do not pay attention to useless Axumite old buildings because they did not save the Tigrayans from hunger and poverty; they do not worship individual despots like the Habashas.
The presence of two fragments of Axumite inscriptions and one coin at Meroe certainly suggests that the Axumites were in the area.