Aksum

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Aksum

or

Axum

(both: äkso͞om`), town (1994 pop. 27,148), Tigray region, N Ethiopia. Aksum was the capital of an empire (c.1st–8th cent. A.D.) that controlled much of what is now N Ethiopia. In the 4th cent. the emperor Ezana was converted to Christianity, and today Aksum is a major center of Ethiopian Christianity. The Ark of the Covenant is said to have been brought there from Jerusalem in Solomon's time and placed in the church of St. Mary of Zion, where Ethiopia's emperors were later crowned. The town is also noted for its gigantic carved pre-Christian obelisks, and there is an extensive underground royal necropolis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Axumite Heritage Foundation will receive a $1,000 IRRT Mission Enhancement Grant to support a new Chromebook lab in the Foundation Library in Axum.
On the contrary, the Axumite civilization was shared by the trans-Mareb region.
100) On Axumite missionary efforts in southwest Arabia, see J.
Belfiore supplies helpful charts and maps, a rich array of indices and a bibliography, to which we might add, multa inter alia: on the (Ethiopian) Axumite kingdom (p.
16) About a hundred-fifty years after Akiva, Ethiopians and Jews, perhaps including Axumite Jews from the ancient Ethiopian capital city, Axum, fought side by side in alliance with Queen Zenobia (who ruled the Syrian kingdom of Palmyra, c.
During the 1st Century, Abyssinia had an organized government, led by the Axumite Empire, established in the northern part of the nation by Ge'ez-speaking Christian people.
The modern ideology of the Ethiopian state evolved from what was once the Axumite Kingdom of Abyssinia, which Africanized descendants of Arab settlers formed in the first century AD (Michels, 1991).
They tell of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba; the Ark of the Covenant, which is said to rest in Axum; the great Axumite kingdom and the birth of Christianity; the rise of Islam; and King Lalibela, who is believed to have constructed 11 rock-hewn churches, still standing today and considered the eighth wonder of the world.
It seems more likely that the foundation for the legend lies in the prosperous Axumite empire in the north of present-day Ethiopia.
It seems that Egyptian, Nabatean, Roman, Greek, Parthian, Phoenician, Himyarite, Axumite, Hadrami, Swahili, perhaps Meroitic, and even Indonesian cultures and/or empires were all, at one time or another, if not constantly, centrally concerned about their engagement with this region.
Burstein also provides a brief preliminary chapter outlining Kushite and Axumite history, which discusses the availability of historical sources and the problems encountered in the historiography of these regions, concluding with useful notes on the individual texts and their context, as well as a brief bibliography.
Ethiopia's first recorded kingdom was the Axumite which grew up around Axum in the northern highlands in the third century BC.