azimuth

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Related to Azimuthal angle: true azimuth

azimuth

(ăz`əməth), in astronomy, one coordinate in the altazimuth coordinate systemaltazimuth coordinate system
or horizon coordinate system,
astronomical coordinate system in which the position of a body on the celestial sphere is described relative to an observer's celestial horizon and zenith.
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. It is the angular distance of a body measured westward along the celestial horizon from the observer's south point.

azimuth

(az -ă-mŭth) See horizontal coordinate system.

Azimuth

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

One can locate a specific celestial object in several ways, most of which involve specifying two coordinates. The azimuth is one of the coordinates of such a system. Although the notion of azimuth is basically simple, it is not simple to explain. Imagine that a group of people are looking at a star. From where they are standing, they can measure the angle between the horizon and the star. This gives them one coordinate in terms of angular distance (called the altitude, for obvious reasons). Then imagine a geometric plane that, like some kind of gigantic wall, cuts through Earth, intersecting the north and south poles, the place where they are standing, and the point directly over their heads (the zenith). They then measure another angle with their surveying instrument, this time between the imaginary wall and the star. This angular distance gives them the azimuth.

Sources:

Filbey, John, and Peter Filbey. The Astrologer’s Companion. Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, UK: Aquarian Press, 1986.
Gettings, Fred. Dictionary of Astrology. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1985.

azimuth

[′az·ə·məth]
(astronomy)
Horizontal direction of a celestial point from a terrestrial point, expressed as the angular distance from a reference direction, usually measured from 0° at the reference direction clockwise through 360°.
(engineering)
In directional drilling, the direction of the face of the deviation tool with respect to magnetic north.
(geodesy)
Horizontal direction on the earth's surface.

azimuth

azimuth
In plane surveying, a horizontal angle measured clockwise from north meridian to the direction of an object or fixed point.

azimuth

azimuthclick for a larger image
azimuth
azimuthclick for a larger image
i. A direction expressed as a horizontal angle, usually in degrees, measured clock-wise from a reference datum or direction, usually north. The azimuth will be a true zenith, grid azimuth, magnetic azimuth, or relative azimuth, depending upon which reference datum is used.
ii. The arc of the observer's rational horizon or the angle at his zenith contained between the observer's celestial meridian and the vertical circle through that body. It is the distance, measured in degrees, along the horizon westward from the south point of the horizon to the place where the vertical circle through an object intersects the horizon.
iii. As it pertains to aerial photography, the azimuth of a photograph is the clock-wise horizontal angle measured about the ground nadir point from the ground survey north meridian to the principal plane of the photograph. Also called azimuth of the principal plane.

azimuth

Astronomy navigation the angular distance usually measured clockwise from the north point of the horizon to the intersection with the horizon of the vertical circle passing through a celestial body

azimuth

The trajectory of an angle measured in degrees going clockwise from a base point. A disk azimuth alignment test checks for the correct positioning of the read/write head to the track.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present work, a novel macro-driven six-axis sample manipulator was exploited to automatically translate and rotate samples through the required incident and azimuthal angles, enabling a more efficient and precise measurements at off-centerline locations where both the degree and direction of surface orientation must be determined.
Test 1 is the horizontal length test at the near position (1 m away, azimuthal angle of 0[degrees]).
9 (c), we note that the vertical angle plot shows a saw-tooth pattern indicating dependence on the azimuthal angle.
Here [theta] and [partial derivative] denote polar respectively azimuthal angles ([theta] [member of] [0, [pi]], [partial derivative]2 [0, 2[pi])), [Y.
The light incident upon the sample has an azimuthal angle and an ellipticity predictable from the settings of the polarizer and compensator.
This may be expressed in terms of the relative attenuation and phase shift of the parallel component with respect to the perpendicular component that occurs, represented by the azimuthal angle [delta], and relative phase shift [psi].
In many instances it is sufficient to plot the area detector data as averages over all azimuthal angles for constant q as a function of q (circular average).
Relative estimates of the [Beta]-crystalline phase were made on the quadrant-averaged peak intensities integrated over the azimuthal angles and calibrated to an integral Turner-Jones index for unoriented systems (14).
0] was obtained directly from the plot of I = f(2[Theta]); (ii) The corresponding scattered intensities were obtained for the other azimuthal angles ([I.
Polar angles (orientation) and azimuthal angles (direction) of the facets were also calculated based on the facet normals of the triangulated surface.
Representative S K edge spectra at different azimuthal angles, Fig.