Bacillus cereus

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Bacillus cereus

[bə‚sil·əs ′sir·ē·əs]
(microbiology)
A spore-forming bacterium that often survives cooking and grows to large numbers in improperly refrigerated foods; it produces both a diarrheal toxin and an emetic toxin in the gastrointestinal tract following its ingestion via contaminated meats, dried foods, and rice.
References in periodicals archive ?
After implementation of new disinfection and sterilization procedures, no new cases of B.
Initial enrichment was made in Tryptone soy broth (TSB) (Hi-Media, Mumbai, India) supplemented with 500U/ ml of polymyxin B at 37[degrees]C for 24-48 h followed by streaking on B.
In the United Kingdom, one study found that 108 of 110 B.
The assay uses two sets of primers, one of which was designed to detect both B.
Methods: Selective plating on polymixin-pyruvate-egg yolkomannitol-bromocresoi purple agar (PEMPA) was used for isolation of B.
This outbreak seems to be the first one documented to have occurred from indirect ingestion of B.
35]S-methionine in experiments to measure effects on human cell biosynthesis and VCPs derived from strains of B.
Except for a few brazen plants and microorganisms, B.
They assayed 25-g samples from 10 sources of each cake ingredient for B.
The goal of scientists at the University of Delaware was to study the germination and inactivation of B.
At certain concentrations, the sensitivity of planktonic B.