BSE


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BSE

bovine spongiform encephalopathy: a fatal slow-developing disease of cattle, affecting the nervous system. It is caused by a prion protein and is thought to be transmissable to humans, causing a variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding the slow performance of BSE, Mahmasani said the volume of trade on BSE diminished from 2008-13 due to several factors, including the economic crisis.
Effective today, each of the BSE indices will be co-branded "S&P" including the SENSEX, BSE 200 and BSE 100.
Providing direct custody and clearing services to the investors at the BSE is an integral part of Citi's regional expansion plan to embed its securities and funds services business in the region.
Through the BSE and OLG merger, other opportunities have been made available and BSE is extremely proud to be able to facilitate the Royal Holloway MBA Programme through the University of London.
David Richardson, Chief Executive of LGC, commented: "LGC is delighted to open the new BSE laboratory in Exeter to provide a streamlined testing service to our customers in the South West of England.
BSE costs continue to impact heavily on the livestock sector through Specified Risk Material Controls, inspections at meat processing plants and BSE testing of all cattle over 24 months and the testing of fallen stock over 24 months, amongst other measures.
Some of these polymorphisms may influence BSE susceptibility in cattle, he says.
Not only does the United States already have measures in place to protect the food supply from BSE, but worldwide, BSE is a diminishing threat.
This revealed "unusual molecular profiles" which made it impossible to rule out BSE.
Experts working at the EU's laboratories in Weybridge, Surrey, have been studying the brains of two sheep from France and one from Cyprus amid concerns that they could contain the first detected cases of BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) in sheep.
Now, after years of intensive efforts to eradicate BSE and establish the toughest meat monitoring controls, the Government and the farming industry is expecting the news it has long awaited.
Professor William Hill of the University of Edinburgh investigated why cases of BSE are still occurring despite the 1996 ban on feed containing animal protein and the control measures put in place by the government.