Baader-Meinhof gang


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Baader-Meinhof gang

German terrorists. [Ger. Hist.: Facts (1978), 114–115]
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TWISTED KILLERS: Two of the Baader-Meinhof Gang wreak havoc
After the capture of the original RAF members, a new generation of RAF terrorists emerged and conducted a violent campaign of attacks aimed at forcing the German government to release the original cast of the Baader-Meinhof gang.
Mysteries of the Organism, LaBruce takes on the radical left, concocting a merry band of sexual renegades who fashion themselves on the infamous Baader-Meinhof gang, the most notorious band of post-WWII German terrorists.
Which brings us to the single most astonishing aspect of "MOMA2000": its elevation of Gerhard Richter's cycle of paintings about the fate of the German terrorists known as the Baader-Meinhof Gang to a position of unrivaled preeminence in the art of the last four decades--the only achievement of the period addressed in "Open Ends" to merit a special monograph of its own.
Several European countries had their own home-grown terrorist groups; Italy's Red Brigade, and Germany's Baader-Meinhof Gang are examples.
In the late 1960s, Fischer was associated with the Soviet-sponsored Baader-Meinhof Gang, which is also known as the "Red Army Fraction.
Oktober 1977" series of 1988, on the Baader-Meinhof gang.
Citing religious scholar Malise Ruthven's work, Gray notes that Muslim terrorists imported the vanguard concept" 'from Europe, through a lineage that stretches back to the [French Revolutionary] Jacobins, through the [Soviet] Bolsheviks and latter-day Marxist guerrillas such as the Baader-Meinhof gang.
There is also an account, admittedly rather understated, of what Mr Power accepts as a case where Amnesty got things wrong -- when it was drawn into intercessions on behalf of captured members of the German Baader-Meinhof gang, who were terrorists in need of psychiatrists.
West Germany became a major focal point for much of this disruptive and dangerous behavior, and names of previously unknown subversive groups began to appear with increasing frequency in the media: Red Army Faction, June Second Movement, the Baader-Meinhof gang, along with many other sub- and splinter branches of these and other groups.
During this period, he became fascinated by the Baader-Meinhof gang, a group of extreme left-wing terrorists.