Baalbek

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Baalbek

(bäl`bĕk), ancient city, now in Lebanon, 35 mi (56 km) NW of Damascus, in the Al BiqaBiqa, Al
, or El Bika
, upland valley of Lebanon and Syria, 75 mi (121 km) long and 5 to 9 mi (8–14.5 km) wide, between the Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon ranges; highest part of the Rift Valley complex.
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 (Bekaa) valley. Originally it was probably devoted to the worship of Baal or Bel, the Phoenician sun god, although no traces of an early Phoenician settlement have survived. The Greeks called the city Heliopolis [city of the sun]. It became very prominent in Roman days and was made a separate colony by Augustus. Both Greek and Roman architects employed their genius on Baalbek's buildings. Among the most imposing Roman remains are the temple of Bacchus and the temple of Jupiter. The city was sacked by invaders and was destroyed by an earthquake in 1759.

In the mid-1970s the modern town of Baalbek, which borders the ruins of the ancient city, became a stronghold of Palestinian and Syrian forces, changing hands several times during Lebanon's 15-year civil war. Tourism, the city's staple industry, was interrupted until the 1990s. Baalbek has since become a stronghold of the Lebanese Hezbollah political party and its militia, and was subjected to Israeli air attacks during the 2006 fighting.

Baalbek

a town in E Lebanon: an important city in Phoenician and Roman times; extensive ruins. Pop.: 150 000 (1998 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
On average many earn about $ 200 per month (and all the 'red bud' hashish or coke they can handle and still do their job from certain employers around North of Baalbec near Knessneh) but they can't easily leave the Bekaa.
Setting out from Semlin (Zemun) near Belgrade, he travelled via Constantinople, Smyrna, Cyprus, Beirut, Nazareth, and Jerusalem, to Cairo, and then he started his return home via Nablus, Damascus, Baalbec, and Satalieh.
Having so decreed, he descended from Mount Scopus in order to make a side trip into Syria (now sulphurous under a French Mandate) and view the ruins at Baalbec.
But a few days later The Times published a picture during Balfour's aborted visit to the French Syrian Mandate, where he had proceeded simply as a tourist, with the intention of seeing Baalbec.