Baba Yaga


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Baba Yaga

cannibalistic crone; stone-breasted companion of devil. [Russ. Folklore: Leach, 100]
References in periodicals archive ?
They are the heirs of the epic heroes and the villains opposing them - Koshchei the Immortal, Baba Yaga and so on.
Other characters, like the witch Baba Yaga and the giant Finn McCool, are a bit less ubiquitous in modern culture, and some, like the Japanese boy Momotaro or the unnamed girl featured in the Estonian tale "The Devil Bridegroom," will be completely unknown to most English readers.
Firmly in the present day, "A Very Baba Yaga Halloween" by Joy Preble sees the famous witch cruising neighborhoods for candy, while Mari Mancusi's "Some Like it Hot" depicts the trials of dragon dating, when raging hormones can result in blowing up the chem lab.
Danny Groves (@dpgroves6) Dear Secret Diner, I've just been to Baba Yaga for the first time (recommended by you exactly a year ago) to have lunch.
Now, to earn her place, Masha must pass a series of tricky tests(tm) Russian folklore icon Baba Yaga mentors a lonely teen in a wry graphic novel that balances gleefully between the modern and the timeless.
The whole family can get to meet Ded Moroz -- a Slavic fictional character similar to Santa -- his granddaughter Snegurochka (the Snow Maiden), and the villain Baba Yaga (a female supernatural being).
The first thing that comes to mind when someone says Baba Yaga is Keanu Reeves from John Wick, but then again, the movie was epic.
Raised on Polish fairy tales by her Lithuanian father and Polish mother, novik here reworks various legends and folk tales, including that of Baba Yaga.
Baba Yaga in her mortar, defending Mother Russia from the invaders?
In order to avoid being eaten, Ekaterina agrees to accompany Baba Yaga aboard her enchanted house on legs to Saint Petersburg for an audience with the tsar.
Osborne's Baba Yaga is malign, the Catacombs dank and mysterious, his unhatched chicks dance gaily - all captured in demonstration-class sound.
Her aunt is really Baba Yaga and her neighbor Masha lives with a bear (a reference to the Russian folk tale "Masha and the Bear").