Babenberg

Babenberg

(bä`bənbĕrk), ruling house of Austria (976–1246). It possibly descended from, or succeeded, a powerful Franconian family of the 9th cent. from whose castle the city of Bamberg probably took its name. Holy Roman Emperor Otto II created Count Leopold of Babenberg margrave of the Eastern March (i.e., Austria). Among Leopold's successors were Leopold IIILeopold III
or Saint Leopold,
c.1073–1136, margrave of Austria (1095–1136). By his marriage (1106) with Agnes, widow of Duke Frederick I of Swabia (see Hohenstaufen), he became the stepfather of German King Conrad III and the father of Otto of Freising and
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; Leopold IV and Henry II, also dukes of Bavaria (1139–56); and Henry II, called Jasomirgott ("if God will") for his favorite phrase. Henry II became (1156) the first duke of Austria. In 1192 the Babenbergs inherited Styria. Duke Leopold V took part in the Third Crusade and later made Richard IRichard I,
 Richard Cœur de Lion
, or Richard Lion-Heart,
1157–99, king of England (1189–99); third son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine.
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 of England a prisoner. Leopold VI, called the Glorious, brought the house to its greatest power. His son, Frederick II, called the Quarrelsome, died childless in 1246, and Austria passed (1251) to Ottocar IIOttocar II
or Přemysl Ottocar II,
c.1230–1278, king of Bohemia (1253–78), son and successor of Wenceslaus I. Ottocar shrewdly exploited the disorders of the great interregnum in the Holy Roman Empire to build an empire reaching from Bohemia to the
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 of Bohemia, who married Frederick's sister. Under Babenberg rule Austria was extended through eastward colonization, and relative peace was maintained through intermarriage with the ruling families of Bohemia and Poland. As a result the Babenbergs were in part responsible for the multinational character of the later Hapsburg empire.
References in periodicals archive ?
The late Austro-Hungarian Empire--known after 1867 as the Dual Monarchy--traces its origins back to 967 AD when the Carolingian emperor, Otto the Great, bestowed a feudal grant upon one of his followers, Leopold of Babenberg.
Austrian history as such dates back to 976, when Leopold von Babenberg became the ruler of much of present-day Austria.
This was the core of an eastern march and subsequent duchy of the Holy Roman Empire enfeoffed by Emperor Otto Il to Leopold of Babenberg.
It is difficult to cavil over an introductory chapter which succinctly presents in twenty pages his discovery of seventy-six drawings of Ovid's Metamorphoses in the Berlin Kupferstichkabinett, the profiles of the nineteenth-century scholar from whose collection it came, Carl Ferdinand Friedrich von Nagler (1770-1846); the career of the original patron to whom there is a dedication and date of 1556, Wolfgang Muntzer von Babenberg (1524-77); and the artist of the Ovid series, Jean Jacques Boissard (1528-1602), whose life for a short time dovetails with that of his patron.
La dinastia bavara de los Babenberg reino en Austria durante casi un siglo y el territorio sufrio la germanizacion.
The chronicle begins in the mid twelfth century, focussing in its first part on the power struggle between Ottokar II of Bohemia and Bela IV of Hungary for the overlordship of Austria after the deaths of duke Frederick (1246), last of the Austrian Babenberg dynasty, and the Hohenstaufen emperor Frederick II (1250)--thus approximately at the time and place Biterolf und Dietleib was written, according to the standard view.
Texts examined here are German foundation chronicles (Stifterchroniken), and genealogical histories which derive from various parts of western Europe, as dynastic princely history emerges in the vernacular by the second hall of the twelfth century in the Anglo-Norman area, with Wace's Roman de Rou, but not until the thirteenth century in Germany, with treatments of the Liudolfing, Welf and Babenberg families in monastic chronicles and territorial and dynastic histories.
Portraits of Czech rulers hang on the walls of Karlstein Castle, and in the corridors of Melk Abbey there are portraits of the rulers of the Babenberg dynasty (tenth to thirteenth century) and the Hapsburg dynasty (thirteenth century), even though no one had any idea how most of these rulers looked.
All through 1996 celebrations have been based upon the fact that on November lst, 996, the Holy Roman Emperor, Otto Ill, issued a document - a deed of investment for his vassal in the central Danube, Henry of Babenberg, which contains the earliest extant use of the term 'Ostarrichi' - Old High German for 'Osterreich'.
They had been inventing traditions ever since the fourteenth century when they incorporated into their own mythology the heroes of the Babenberg dynasty which had preceded them as dukes of Austria.
A native of Alsace, Reinmar became court poet of the Babenberg dukes in Vienna.
In 976, Leopold von Babenberg became the first in his family to rule the territory; the Babenberg line of succession lasted until the death of Frederick II in 1246.