Babington Plot


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Babington Plot

abortive plot to assassinate Elizabeth I; sealed Mary Stuart’s fate (1586). [Br. Hist.: NCE, 202]
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In the 1570s, Gwydir was home to Katherine of Berain, cousin of Queen Elizabeth I, and the castle has associations with the Babington Plot of 1586 and the Gunpowder Plot of 1605.
35 Fakenham The staunch catholic was a spy for Mary Queen of Scots and was involved in the Babington plot to kill Queen Elizabeth 1.
In the 1570s Gwydir was the home of Katherine of Berain, cousin of Queen Elizabeth I and the castle has associations with the Babington Plot (1586) and the Gunpowder Plot (1605).
Why was he in Deptford with 'friends' like Ingram Frizer (an agent of Marlowe's patron Thomas Walsingham), Nicholas Skeres (a professional conman, implicated in the Babington plot of 1586), and Robert Poley (another player in the Babington plot and an informer of the chief Elizabethan spymaster, Sir Francis Walsingham)?
Warnicke goes to great lengths to demonstrate the degree to which Mary's thinking was clouded by 1587, possibly due to her long battle with porphyria, thus making her willing to participate in the Babington Plot.
There are strong similarities to an earlier Catholic conspiracy, the Babington Plot to free Mary, Queen of Scots in 1586, but where in 1586 the government had both written evidence and the testimonies of most of those involved, Catesby's death has left a large hole in the inner story of the Gunpowder Plot.
In the light of Charles Tilney's involvement in the Babington Plot, Estrild/Locrine takes on an enigmatic aspect.
The first three chapters deal with the various conspiracies - the Northern Rising, the Ridolfi Plot, the Throckmorton Plot, and the Babington Plot - designed to overthrow Protestant Elizabeth and replace her with the Catholic Queen of Scots, as well as the problems posed for the English government by clandestine Catholic priests.
The unmasking of the Babington plot to assassinate the Queen, and its dreadful aftermath, had rocked the country and Nick's old schoolmaster had made a terrifying homily of it - Robert Cecil, spearheading the discovery, was a name to conjure with.
In also denying that the queen's councilors attempted to pressure her to act, Mears apparently overlooked the Babington Plot, nurtured by Sir Francis Walsingham.
Reworking material from her book on treason and drama, Karen Cunningham, '"Forsake thy king and do but join with me": Marlowe and Treason', reveals the connections between the discourse of treason in the Babington plot trials and in Marlowe's plays.
Babington plot (July) to assassinate Elizabeth; trial and conviction of Mary Queen of Scots (Oct).