plantar reflex

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Related to Babinski sign: hyperreflexia, ankle clonus, Fasciculations, Upper Motor Neuron Lesion

plantar reflex

[′plan·tər ′rē‚fleks]
(physiology)
Flexion of the toes in response to stroking of the outer surface of the sole, from heel to little toe.
References in periodicals archive ?
Houten and Noce (16) retrospectively reported the prevalence of the Hoffmann sign (68%), Babinski sign (33%) and hyperreflexia (60%) in 225 patients who underwent surgery for CSM.
8 ture, [degrees]C Reduced level of ++ +++ + +++ consciousness Generalized seizures ++ + Neck rigidity and + ++ + ++ Kernig sign Nausea, vomiting + ++ + ++ Upper motor neuron + + pattern of muscle weakness Relapse of + + febrile illness Outcome a d a a d Advanced disease Cognitive decline ++ + ++ Apathy + + Dysarthria +++ ++ ++ Dysphagia Brisk deep ++ ++ ++ tendon reflexes Spastic quadri/ +++ + ++ paraparesis Increased muscle tone + + + Babinski sign + + + Spastic gait +++ ++ ++ Falls + ++ Sphincter dysfunction + ++ Extrapyramidal + + ++ rigidity Obesity + + + Cachexia + + Overall duration 18 11 A 48 10 of illness mo wk mo wk Family 3 Family 4 Feature 3-1 3-2 4-1 4-2 4-3 Sex F M M F F Age at onset, y 31 21 51 47 36 Febrile stage of illness Duration, wk ND 2 ND ND 4 Maximum tempera- 39.
All fulfilled the clinical criteria of the typical form of FA (1): age of onset before 20 and progressive cerebellar ataxia with dysarthria, areflexia, deep sensory loss in lower limbs, pyramidal weakness, and Babinski signs.
She had medial deviation in both eyes, neck stiffness, positive Kernig and Brudzinski signs, and bilateral positive Babinski signs.
Clinical neurologic findings can include numbness and paresthesias, weakness and ataxia, sphincter disturbances, possible diminished position and vibration senses, positive Romberg and Babinski signs, irritability, forgetfulness, and even psychosis or dementia.
He also had generalized spasticity, hyperreflexic deep tendon reflexes, and bilateral Babinski signs.
Spastic paraparesis (muscle strength of all lower extremity muscles was 2/5) of her legs with inability to walk, hyperreflexia of the lower extremities with bilateral Babinski signs, hypoesthesia below the T7 dermatome, no sphincter dysfunction, and absent abdominal wall reflexes were also recorded.