Babrius


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Babrius

(bā`brēəs), fl. 2d cent.?, Greek fabulist, versifier of the fables of AesopAesop
, legendary Greek fabulist. According to Herodotus, he was a slave who lived in Samos in the 6th cent. B.C. and eventually was freed by his master. Other accounts associate him with many wild adventures and connect him with such rulers as Solon and Croesus.
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. Many of the medieval prose collections of Aesop were based on Babrius. He may have been a Hellenized Roman.

Babrius

 

Ancient Greek poet-fabulist of the second century A.D. who versified the fables of Aesop.

The fables of Babrius are distinguished by liveliness of narration; the moralizing element is weakly developed, and the critical element is nearly absent. They are characterized by an ironic attitude toward the traditional Olympian gods. Of Babrius’ ten books, more than 140 fables in verse form and about 50 in prose have reached us.

WORKS

Fabulae Aesopeae. Edited by O. Crusius. Leipzig, 1897.
In Russian translation:
In Fedr and Babrii, Basni.[Translated by M. L. Gasparov.] Moscow, 1962.
References in periodicals archive ?
Babrius and Phaedrus, xxxiv: West, East Face of Helicon, 502-4.
9,4-5 (elephants), Babrius 80,3-4 (camels), Lucian Pisc.
A wider perspective, suggested by Page in his reference to Babrius, may advance our argument.
Much of his work has focused on Hellenistic poetry (especially that of Callimachus); he has also written on Babrius, Gregory of Nazianzus, Ovid, Juvenal, and Colluthus and has investigated linguistic usage, theophany, the relationship of the Cynics to early Christianity, polar bears in antiquity, and E.
Areas of inquiry range from the reception of Aesop and Babrius in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, to the theory of classical architecture in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.