Bach

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Bach

(bäkh), German family of distinguished musicians who flourished from the 16th through the 18th cent., its most renowned member being Johann Sebastian Bach (see Bach, Johann SebastianBach, Johann Sebastian
, 1685–1750, German composer and organist, b. Eisenach; one of the greatest and most influential composers of the Western world. He brought polyphonic baroque music to its culmination, creating masterful and vigorous works in almost every musical
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). Johannes or Hans Bach, c.1550–1626, was a Thuringian carpetweaver and a musical performer at festivals. His sons and descendants were noted organists and composers. One of his grandsons was Johann Ambrosius Bach, 1645–95, violinist, town musician at Eisenach, and father of Johann Sebastian Bach. Johann Sebastian's eldest brother, Johann Christoph Bach, 1671–1721, was organist at Ohrdruf. When his parents died he took Johann Sebastian, his youngest brother, into his home and taught him. Of the 20 children of Johann Sebastian, several were well known as musicians. The eldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, 1710–84, was made organist at the Sophienkirche in Dresden in 1733 and later (1746–64) organist and musical director at the Liebfrauenkirche in Halle. He was a brilliant organist and well-known composer, but he did not live up to his father's hopes and, after a dissolute life, he died in misery. A younger son was Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (see Bach, Carl Philipp EmanuelBach, Carl Philipp Emanuel
, 1714–88, German composer; second son of J. S. Bach, his only teacher. While harpsichordist at the court of Frederick the Great, where his chief duty for 28 years (1738–67) was to accompany the monarch's performances on the flute, he wrote
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), and the youngest son was Johann Christian Bach (see Bach, Johann ChristianBach, Johann Christian
, 1735–82, German musician and composer; son of J. S. Bach. He went to Italy in 1754, became a Roman Catholic, and composed church music and operas. In 1760 he became organist of the Milan Cathedral.
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).

Bibliography

See P. Young, The Bachs (2 vol., 1978–79); C. Wolff et al., The New Grove Bach Family (1983).

Bach

1. Johann Christian , 11th son of J. S. Bach. 1735--82, German composer, called the English Bach, resident in London from 1762
2. Johann Christoph . 1642--1703, German composer: wrote oratorios, cantatas, and motets, some of which were falsely attributed to J S Bach, of whom he was a distant relative
3. Johann Sebastian . 1685--1750, German composer: church organist at Arnstadt (1703--07) and Mühlhausen (1707--08); court organist at Weimar (1708--17); musical director for Prince Leopold of Köthen (1717--28); musical director for the city of Leipzig (1728--50). His output was enormous and displays great vigour and invention within the northern European polyphonic tradition. His works include nearly 200 cantatas and oratorios, settings of the Passion according to St John (1723) and St Matthew (1729), the six Brandenburg Concertos (1720--21), the 48 preludes and fugues of the Well-tempered Clavier (completed 1744), and the Mass in B Minor (1733--38)
4. Karl (or Carl) Philipp Emanuel , 3rd son of J S Bach. 1714--88, German composer, chiefly of symphonies, keyboard sonatas, and church music
5. Wilhelm Friedemann , eldest son of J S Bach. 1710--84, German composer: wrote nine symphonies and much keyboard and religious music
References in periodicals archive ?
Wolfram Ensslin and Tobias Rimek ('Der Choral bei Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach und das Problem der Zuschreibung') discuss a strangely neglected area of Bach scholarship: his use of the chorale.
Bach cultivated personal connections with both authors, but he was already familiar with the more limited discussions of historical developments to be found, for instance, in some of Johann Mattheson's writings or in the more specialized Abhandlung von der Fuge (Berlin, 1753-54) (2) by Friedrich Wilhelm Marpurg.
6, contemplating its unique instrumentation, one can ponder and read about what sizes of violas da gamba Bach might have had in mind.
In addition to its value as an insightful historical account of the reception of Bach's keyboard works in the century following the composer's death, Dirst's Engaging Bach provides thoughtful connections to the present day.
No one has yet ventured an explanation for this change, although Marshall later remarked that "it is hard to imagine what may have led Bach even to have considered G major as the opening tonality for this recitative at all" (Cantata Autographs, x).
However, Bach began composing the setting of Latin liturgical texts that would be incorporated into the B-Minor Mass in 1724, with the SSSATB Sanctus in D major.
Will's differentiation of contemporaneous religious currents clarifies Bach's choice of text for Die Auferstehung, a work that never achieved the popularity of Graun's Tod Jesu, as Bach had hoped.
This publication provides significant additional documentation on how Bach handled the requisite task of providing a setting of the Passion narrative for the annual Good Friday Vespers in Leipzig.
After this introductory material, a critical edition is given of each libretto for the cantatas Bach composed for the respective Sunday, including those for which the music is lost and only the texts are known, which anthologies of cantata texts usually omit.
Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Hartel, 1990]) and the multiple volumes of the Bach Compendium (another detailed catalog of Bach's works).
The carefully edited volume is supplemented by the complete text of the Mass as Bach set it, a handy table of the work's single movements and their parody models, a good bibliography of secondary literature and of editions, as well as an extensive index.
Bach [London: Cassel, 1972]), are presented within the context of commentary and are primarily concerned with providing sense and meaning of the text for historical study.