Back Orifice

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Back Orifice

A program that is used to compromise a Windows machine. It installs itself as a server, allowing a hacker with the client counterpart to manipulate the machine more completely than the user at the keyboard. Named as a play on BackOffice, an earlier Microsoft software suite, Back Orifice was created for Windows 95 and 98, and Back Orifice 2000 (BO2K) for Windows NT and subsequent Windows operating systems.

Back Orifice was created by "The Cult of the Dead Cow" (cDc), a hacker organization (www.cultdeadcow.com). There are various "BO removers," which are programs that detect and remove it. See BO remover, Trojan and RAT. See also back office.
References in periodicals archive ?
WITH REGARD TO THE "DEFINING MOments" quiz in "Tech Talk" (October), defining SubSeven and BackOrifice as rootkits is inaccurate.
Another commonly used method is to scan the Internet for widely released 'Trojan horse' programs, such as BackOrifice, NetBus or SubSeven.
Existing Trojan horse programs such as BackOrifice or Netbus include the capability to turn on a computer's microphone and video camera and remotely record what a user is saying or doing on their computer.
Trojan programs such as BackOrifice allow this kind of surveillance to take place, by recording audio as .
Vulnerability remediation is not limited to installing patches, but rather encompasses the entire scope of IT vulnerabilities, including software defects, insecure user accounts, unnecessary services such as telnet, backdoors such as BackOrifice and SubSeven, as well as misconfigurations.
Furthermore, toolkits that include the complete source code of the vandal, such as BackOrifice 2000, allow even beginning hackers (known as script kiddies) to produce endless variants and easily create one-time code for attacks on specific targets.
RID's attack signature database includes well known attack signatures such as SATAN, CyberCop, strobe, and other port scanners, Trojans such as root kit and BackOrifice, Denial of Service, DNS, sendmail, IP spoofing, source routing, and attacks specifically for Microsoft Servers.
More than 15 different varieties of back door trojans were reported by customers to Trend's Virus Doctor during the last week alone, including such luminaries as SubSeven, NetBus and BackOrifice just to name a few.
It is commonly held that BackOrifice is likely only the tip of the iceberg, that even more dangerous stealth programs are going to be propagated across the Internet.
The first ISS Webinar will focus on the latest Windows backdoor programs including an update on NetBus and BackOrifice programs and what organizations can do to protect themselves against from these potentially dangerous attacks.
Two recently discovered Back Door programs are BackOrifice, from a group called Cult of the Dead Cow, and NetBus.