Baden-Powell


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Baden-Powell

Robert Stephenson Smyth , 1st Baron Baden-Powell. 1857--1941, British general, noted for his defence of Mafeking (1899--1900) in the Boer War; founder of the Boy Scouts (1908) and (with his sister Agnes) the Girl Guides (1910)
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Baden-Powell insisted that there was a lot of tracking for boys to do even in towns, and that the small and undramatic fauna of the British Isles--frogs, voles, weasels, and the like--were just as interesting as the big game of Africa.
S Baden-Powell claimed that Marico was the most difficult area to "settle" or pacify, because of the rugged terrain and an "especially rugged type of Boer inhabiting it": See RSSBPP, Correspondence: "Baden-Powell to Lord Roberts, Lead Mines 40 m.
Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell was born in London in February, 1875 ?
A hundred years on, Baden-Powell could come back and see that very little has changed.
After finding notes he had written in South Africa for the army interested boys, Baden-Powell tried out his ideas at a campsite on Brownsea Island, Dorset, to try out his ideas.
A IN 1909 at a Scout rally at Crystal Palace, Baden-Powell (below) was approached by a group of girls who wanted to join.
The Humshaugh camp saw 30 invested Boy Scouts from around the UK who followed the Scout Method and Scout Law as developed by Baden-Powell and published in his Scouting for Boys.
In his letter to the Birkenhead Scout troop founders, Baden-Powell wrote: "I do hope that Birkenhead will make a real step in advance in starting the movement because it was in Birkenhead that I first mooted the idea in public and received such an encouraging response.
Hodge Hill Girls' School pupils Bethany Millman and Chelsea Wood were honoured with the Baden-Powell Challenge award for finishing 10 challenges and a camping exhibition.
Those 217 days made Col Robert Baden-Powell an immortal, for Mafeking lit the imagination of the British public, becoming a shining symbol of the Empire's will to resist, of Britain's refusal to surrender.
Lily Baden-Powell had already combined high-flying careers in law and banking with caring for four children under eight by the time she died at the age of 38 in August 1995.