Bahasa Indonesia


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Bahasa Indonesia

(bähä`sä), another name for Indonesian, one of the Malayo-Polynesian languagesMalayo-Polynesian languages
, sometimes also called Austronesian languages
, family of languages estimated at from 300 to 500 tongues and understood by approximately 300 million people in Madagascar; the Malay Peninsula; Indonesia and New Guinea; the Philippines;
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References in periodicals archive ?
Probably due to the Philippines' proximity to Malaysia and Indonesia, the language of these countries, Bahasa Indonesia and Bahasa Malayu, are very similar to the Filipino dialect.
Anderson contends that the birth of Indonesia as a nation was enabled by the spread of Bahasa Indonesia across the archipelago as the emerging lingua franca; nationalist movements later recognized it as the national language (pp.
In Tomohon, as in Makassar, I lectured in the Indonesian language, Bahasa Indonesia.
What needs to be done in the future is to include articles published by ecumenical bodies such as WCC and CCA in Bahasa Indonesia for a wider readership.
He also asserted that by learning Bahasa Indonesia, one actually learns the language of seven countries.
Most insightful in the introduction is the intellectual difference in "writing about Islam and women in English" and the same in bahasa Indonesia.
There are lists of recommended restaurants, ideas of what to do and where to go when it's raining, action adventure tour ideas, A list of common phrases or sayings in Bahasa Indonesia is included and other interesting facts and figures about Bali.
In addition to Arabic, the resource centre is available in seven languages, including traditional Chinese, simplified Chinese, Korean, Thai, Bahasa Indonesia, Hindi and Bengali.
It is also available in seven languages, including traditional Chinese, simplified Chinese, Korean, Thai, Bahasa Indonesia, Hindi and Bengali.
Wings Air, an airline in Indonesia, where the native language is Bahasa Indonesia, once used a curiously awkward English slogan.