Chaleur Bay

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Chaleur Bay

(shəlo͝or`), inlet of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, c.85 mi (140 km) long and from 15 to 25 mi (24–40 km) wide, between N N.B. and the Gaspé Peninsula, E Que., Canada. It is the submerged valley of the Restigouche River, which enters at its head. Chaleur Bay is a famous fishing ground for cod, herring, mackerel, and salmon, and there are many Acadian fishing villages on both coasts. Jacques CartierCartier, Jacques
, 1491–1557, French navigator, first explorer of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and discoverer of the St. Lawrence River. He made three voyages to the region, the first two (1534, 1535–36) directly at the command of King Francis I and the third
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, who was the first European to visit (1534) the bay, named it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, no general pattern of distribution in relation with the tidal height can be drawn for the two species found in the Baie des Chaleurs and the Gaspe Peninsula.
trossulus in the Baie des Chaleurs and the Gaspe Peninsula.
Potentiel aquacole par teledetection passive et SIG: application aux eaux cotieres de la baie des Chaleurs (est du Canada).
In the north, sandstone, shale, and conglomerate of the Carboniferous Bonaventure Formation are exposed along the Baie des Chaleurs.
1989) further determined that the Baie des Chaleurs region experienced four major phases of ice flow during the Late Wisconsinan: 1) southeast, 2) east, 3) north-northeast, and 4) multidirectional.
The till becomes much more clay-rich to the north (50-70%), especially at elevations below 100 m along the coast, and along major valleys emptying into the Baie des Chaleurs (Figs.
The major eastward flow (110[degrees]) is likely correlative to the Jacquet and Baie des Chaleurs flow patterns of Rampton et al.
9 km, Table 2) were observed in part of Baie des Chaleurs (Figs 1 and 4, sites 3 and 4), the northeastern tip of Prince Edward Island (Fig.
Lobsters in the Magdelan Islands (Templeman, 1935; Bergeron, 1967) and on the northern shore of Baie des Chaleurs (Corrivault, 1948) traveled average distances ranging from 3 to 16 km and 12 km or less, respectively.
Movements per pendicular to the coast have been documented in the Magdalen Islands (Templeman, 1936; Bergeron, 1967; Munro and Therriault, 1983), Bonavista Bay in Newfoundland (Ennis, 1984), and on the north shore of Baie des Chaleurs (Corrivault, 1948) because a migration of lobsters moving inshore in the spring and offshore in the fall was observed.