Bajazet


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Bajazet:

For Ottoman sultans and princes thus named, use Beyazid.

Bajazet

fierce, reckless, indomitable Sultan of Turkey; Tamerlane’s captive. [Br. Lit.: Tamerlane, Walsh Modern, 39]
See: Bravery
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the reworking was for practical reasons, such as the arrival of the tenor Francesco Borosini from Vienna to sing the role of the hero, Bajazet.
This is the goddess who has made and broken the German and French Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire--Henry V [sic--IV], Frederick Barbarossa, Lewis the Meek--and Bajazet, the Ottoman Sultan.
The plot revolves around two prominent figures in Turkish history: Bajazet and Tamerlano, otherwise known to us as Sultan Bayezit I and Timurlenk, the emperor of the Uzbek Turks.
He wanted to make his capital into a city of the book, and his son Bayezid II, or Bajazet, initiated a movement that led to the creation, around the mosques, of libraries and manuscript workshops.
The 69-year-old, one of the opera world s biggest draws who also conducts, has been forced to withdraw from the role of Bajazet in Handel s "Tamerlano" at Covent Garden in London which he was scheduled to sing on March 5, 8, 11, 15 and 20.
The famed tenor was due to star as Bajazet in Handel's Tamerlano but has now been replaced by US performer Kurt Streit.
Only the Turkish sultan, Bajazet (Domingo) and his daughter, Asteria (Sarah Coburn) appear in period finery, like peacocks in a world of corporate grey.
Since I did just now in Madrid my 126th role - which is Bajazet in "Tamerlano" and marks my first excursion into the repertoire of Handel - you can imagine how much I still adhere to vocal discipline.
The final chapter is a reading of Racine's Bajazet in relation to correspondence, lines of contact, the double standard, and questions of military policy.
The new libretto - and perhaps a manuscript of Francesco Gasparini's accompanying 1719 score, Il Bajazet - probably arrived in September with the star tenor, Francesco Borosini.
The Sultan Bajazet (John Mark Ainsley's taxed tenor) spends the opera not forgiving the Tartar Tamerlano (contralto Sonia Prina) for having defeated him, while Asteria (soprano Sarah Fox), (Canadian mezzo Mary-Ellen Nesi) and Irene (mezzo Maite Beaumont) hatch several love-and jeal-ousy-fuelled plots of revenge and murder.
Alexander Grove as Bajazet was hugely powerful and gripping, particularly in his death scene in the last act.