Bakongo


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Bakongo

 

a people living around the lower reaches of the Congo River in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zaire) and in the border regions of Angola and the People’s Republic of the Congo. Their combined population was 3.2 million according to a 1967 estimate. They speak Kikongo, one of the Bantu family of languages. The majority of Bakon-go retain local traditional beliefs, although some are Christians. Around the 14th century the Bakongo formed the ethnic nucleus of the early feudal state Kongo. The Bakongo retain a matrilinear kinship structure. Their chief occupations are hoe farming (cassava, bananas) and crafts. There is seasonal migration of agricultural workers to industrial employment.

References in periodicals archive ?
Van Wing, Etudes Bakongo, 2e edition, Leopoldville, 1956.
They killed several whites, along with assimilados, African Catholics, house servants and members of tribes other than the Bakongo.
Star performance Hayley Turner completed a fine double on Commerce and Bakongo
In another Bakongo village I witnessed an individual (the local witch doctor) who had built himself the only two-storey house in a 100-mile radius, to literally 'elevate' his status.
3) For example, the Bakongo who resided in northern Angola, Congo, French Congo and Cabinda; the Lunda, who lived in Angola, Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) and the Belgian Congo; the Zande, who are found both in southern Sudan and northern Belgian Congo; and the Tutsi and Hutu, who resided mainly in Rwanda and Burundi but also across the frontier in Congo.
The collision was only 300 yards from shore, said Nyoka Bakongo, a local Red Cross worker.
As for the Bakongo, those who did not work as agricultural labourers were chiefly associated with the business and trade which had developed in the Belgian Congo to the North.
The Institute for Black Catholic Studies (IBCS) with its critical interrogation and retrieval of the fragments of West African BaKongo culture has made a contribution to the controversy over African retensions in American culture.
About 25 percent came from ethnic groups such as the Bakongo, the Tio, and the Mbundu, groups from the Congo-Angola region.
For African, and especially BaKongo groups, the afterlife was a reality; death was a journey to the spirit world, which, nonetheless, did not constitute a break with life on earth.
2) But in another work with the same title, also from 1992, women raising their hands in ecstasy cite the transatlantic gesture of felicity that Bakongo term yangalala and relate to the coming of the spirit.
Portuguese settlers established large plantations using forced labour and increased the yield from the local Bakongo smallholders.