Bakufu


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Related to Bakufu: Ainu, Bushido, daimyo

Bakufu

 

the government of three dynasties of military feudal rulers of Japan (the shoguns): Minamoto, Ashikaga, and Tokugawa. The Bakufu lasted from the end of the 12th century until 1867.

References in periodicals archive ?
As is well known, diplomatic contacts between the Bakufu and the Korean court were mediated by the So daimyo on Tsushima, who maintained a trading outpost, the Waegwan/Wakan, in Pusan, and these contacts can be traced in the vast domain archive that survives.
60) In general, medical books from Korea appear to have been much sought after, for as early as 1657 a Bakufu acupuncturist had asked Tsushima to procure four books including the eighty-five-volume compendium of Korean medicine Hyangyak chipsongbang (1433).
Samhansi kwigam, an anthology of early Korean poetry: published in Japan in 1698, possibly based on the copy owned by Hitomi Chikudo (1637-1696), a poet and Bakufu official.
The evidence for this assertion is the arrest of violent gang members in 1612 by the bakufu and the Kaga domain.
Tokugawa Japan (1603-1867) was not closed to the world, but its limited foreign relations were under tight bakufu control.
president, stated his intention of negotiating a treaty and, when asked for time to think the matter over, told bakufu officials that he would return the next year.
The weakness of the Muromachi bakufu in the Japanese provinces and the presence of separate Jurchen communities in the peninsular northeast underlined the importance of institutionalizing the management of interaction.
For example, in 1470, the imposter Muromachi bakufu official Hatakeyama Yoshikatsu stated in his letter (J.
As Kristina Kade Troost makes clear, the local elite targeted by the Muromachi bakufu were not necessarily drawn from the warrior class.
McMullen details how ideologues during the last of the warrior-governments, the Edo bakufu, sought to first explain and then justify the historical processes which had led ultimately to its establishment.
The last chapter focuses on how, beginning in 1857, ranpo received support from the bakufu after a severe smallpox outbreak.
Najita's portrayal of Daini as "advocating military overthrow of the very Bakufu he served," and a number of his other statements, are certainly brought into question by Wakabayashi's rigorous scrutiny of the historical sources.