Bakufu


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Bakufu: Ainu, Bushido, daimyo

Bakufu

 

the government of three dynasties of military feudal rulers of Japan (the shoguns): Minamoto, Ashikaga, and Tokugawa. The Bakufu lasted from the end of the 12th century until 1867.

References in periodicals archive ?
Mass, "Kamakura bakufu," 59-64; Pierre Francois Souyri, The World Turned Upside Down: Medieval Japanese Society, trans.
As is well known, diplomatic contacts between the Bakufu and the Korean court were mediated by the So daimyo on Tsushima, who maintained a trading outpost, the Waegwan/Wakan, in Pusan, and these contacts can be traced in the vast domain archive that survives.
Los antiguos senores feudales que permanecieron en el poder, protegieron sus Armas comerciales importantes, como Mitsui, sofocadas por el entones regimen bakufu y a quienes las reformas emprendidas en 1868 ofrecian perspectivas de expansion economica.
2) El Bakufu es un consejo, principalmente formado por los ancianos de la familia Tokugawa, que llevaron el control politico durante todo el periodo.
The bakufu and domains were military organizations at their core, designed to regulate samurai warriors.
Bakufu officials agreed to open two ports--Hakodate in Hokkaido and Shimoda at the tip of the Izu Peninsula--to American ships, to treat shipwrecked sailors, and to permit an American consul to reside in Shimoda.
Razan was also made political advisor of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa Bakufu.
The last 150 years of the 250-year reign of the Tokugawa Bakufu was rife with economic failures.
TOBY, STATE AND DIPLOMACY IN EARLY MODERN JAPAN: ASIA IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TOKUGAWA BAKUFU (1984); Kazui Tashiro, Foreign Relations During the Edo Period: Sakoku Reexamined, 8 J.
In that year the Tokugawa Bakufu began to impose restrictions on the trading system, and it was effectively terminated in 1635 when Japanese were forbidden to leave their country.
Sure, we no longer live in the times of Confucius, Mencius, or Hsun-Tzu, nor in the days of the Taika Reform (sixth to seventh century), the Tokugawa Bakufu (1603-1867), or the Iwakura Mission (1871-1873).
An official ideological threshold came into being so that if "discourse had run counter to bakufu (government) interests, it would have been repressed" (Ooms, 1984: 59).