Baldachin


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Related to Baldachin: Baldaquin

Baldachin

 

a festive ceremonial awning over a throne, bed, or church altar. It was originally made of cloth but later also of stone, wood, or metal. The baldachin has been known in Russian architecture since the 11th century under the names sen’ and kivorii.

baldachin, baldacchino, baldachino, baldaquin, ciborium

An ornamental canopy over an altar, usually supported on columns, or a similar form over a tomb or throne.
References in periodicals archive ?
But like the earlier monuments, this one, today in the Castello Sforzesco, originally stood behind the altar of San Giovanni in Conca and likely was surrounded by a now-vanished baldachin.
53) In fact, pictorial evidence for the common presence of the arcuated altar baldachin in Christian worship retreats to the first centuries of art within that tradition; the lower cupola mosaics of uncertain early date in Hagios Giorgios at Salonika, portraying pairs of saints flanking altars with domed canopies, and the Stuma and Riha patens from the late fifth or early sixth century are exemplary in this regard (fig.
Baldachin, black umbrella, bucket with a hole, drizzled horizon, sleazy drape, it hardly mattered which, or as much what cometing bitchcraft, rocketed shitbags, charred cherubim pocked and pitted the iceface of space in time, the black traveller.
However, the number of tombs in baldachin style increased during the 14th-15th centuries, so the dating of A.
Among their objections: moving the main altar to the center of the worship space; placing an organ where the altar once stood; replacing pews with chairs, and removing the baldachin.
Here Betjeman describes the displacement of God's splendor by an edifice of Byzantine grandeur and haughtiness: "Where once the fritillaries hung in the grass / A baldachin pillar is guarding the Mass.
The giant baldachin, suspended over the alabaster table altar - a wrought iron canopy symbolising the Crown of Thorns - is the work of Antoni Gaudi as are the chandeliers wrapped round the pillars which are nicknamed "the garters".
This interpretation is supported by stone statuary of kneeling kings and especially relief representations of kings posed with hands on either side of "cult vessels, fetishes, standards, [and] baldachin poles.
The author then guides a pilgrim in a walk around the typical parts of the traditional Catholic church, explaining the role (and consequently the structure and place) of the altar, the altar rail, the baldachin, the baptistry, the confessional, the facade, the gallery, the lectern, the narthex, the nave, the portal, the pulpit, the reredos, the rose window, the sanctuary, the tabernacle, etc.
A choir intoned a Psalm, as the pope sprinkled incense on the central altar under Bernini's towering bronze baldachin before opening the service with the traditional wish for peace in Latin: "Pax vobis" ("Peace be with you").
These include depictions of the oath-taking ceremony outside the city, a plate depicting the duke progressing under a baldachin, and the closing ceremony in the Groote Markt (figs.
Its distinctive profile comes from its soaring buttresses, while its ethereally light interior is down to Antoni Gaudi, who opened up the space and added a wacky baldachin over the altar.